For a feature story in the current issue of The Blaze Magazine, Billy Hallowell took a look at the atheist movement and found that it has created its own faith system of religious practices to spread secular beliefs.

It seems that the overwhelming religious influence in America has led a segment of atheists to launch a culture war, of sorts, in an effort to strip society of its many references to God.

Here’s a small taste of Billy’s important piece:

For years, non-believers have scoffed at claims that atheism, despite its anti-faith sentiment, follows religious patterns. Regardless of the absence of a higher power within the theology of non-belief, new developments and actions seem to indicate that secularists are embracing some of the same methods, practices and parameters that are present in American churches and religious communities. On the surface, this seems counterintuitive or even improbable, but evidence showcases the intriguing tactics and patterns these individuals adopt, as many non-believers systematically seek others with whom they share similar worldviews.

On the religious front, faith systems are known for offering adherents a plethora of elements that both support and sustain theological underpinnings. From active and supportive communities to a corroboratory force for deeply held views, religions and their associated constructs offer believers a sense of belonging as well as opportunities for continued learning. Traditionally, atheists and non-believers have shunned these elements–and in fact have spent a great deal of effort litigating the removal of mentions of God and related concepts from the public sphere.

Perhaps the overwhelming influence of faith in American society has driven such a stark response from those who reject religious beliefs. After all, atheists and secularists constitute a minority group in the United States, as the majority of Americans believe wholeheartedly in the existence of a higher power. In 2007, the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life found that 78.4 percent of Americans identify as Christians of some sort. In addition, 4.7 percent are classified as “other” (Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist and Hindu) and 16.1 percent are “unaffiliated” (atheists and other unaffiliated non-believers). For those who lack religious beliefs, fitting in and embracing cultural norms can be difficult.

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