Because when Fox News’ Dr. Keith Ablow speaks, we listen.

It must be sports week. On Wednesday Ablow weighed in on the Lance Armstrong interview with Oprah Winfrey, saying for Armstrong to achieve redemption for lying about taking performance-enhancing drugs, he needed to “take our breath away” with a strong confession. Today, it’s about Manti Te’o, the college football star who it has been revealed likely lied about having a girlfriend who died of cancer.

In typical Ablow fashion, the psychiatrist is ready to diagnose and treat Te’o in public via his FoxNews.com column:

… Te’o needs psychological help.  One version of the story paints him vulnerable enough and naïve enough to declare his love and devotion publicly for someone he had never even met, nor Skyped with, let alone kissed.  That version has him grieving her death like a devoted husband—despite never having laid eyes on her, nor touched her.  The other version of the story paints him as a co-conspirator in fraud and deception, willing to manipulate the feelings of millions of people for his own pleasure or advancement—a younger, even sicker version of Lance Armstrong.

And either way, Te’o is the poster boy for a phenomenon I have been writing about for years, and which threatens our culture in a dramatic way:  The erosion of reality and embrace of fiction via social networking, “reality” TV and technology.

Call it The Delusion Disease. …

Social media, “reality” TV and technology have infected and intoxicated us such that we won’t—or, even worse—we can’t face facts, anymore.