A Colorado 2nd grader has been suspended for hurling an IMAGINARY grenade DURING RECESS.

Alternative headline: Young boy suspended for using his imagination.

Local Fox station KDVR reports the lunacy (h/t Right Scoop):

The 7-year-old says he was trying to save the world. But school administrators say he broke a key rule during his pretend play.

“I was trying to save people and I just can’t believe I got dispended,” says Alex Evans, who doesn’t understand his suspension any better than he can pronounce it.

“It’s called ‘rescue the world,’” he says.

He was playing a game during recess at Loveland’s Mary Blair Elementary School and threw an imaginary grenade into a box with pretend evil forces inside.

“I pretended the box, there’s something shaking in it, and I go ‘pshhh.’”

The boy didn’t throw anything real or make any threats against anyone. He explains he was pretending to be the hero. “So nothing can get out and destroy the world.”

Can we all agree that the public’s hypersensitivity to anything resembling violence has gone beyond too far?  It really makes you wonder what kind of generation we’re raising.  What sort of leaders will come from teaching kids that violence is never the answer?  

The sad fact is that violence is necessary at times — whether you’re trying to “rescue the world” or take down an armed madman with something stronger than a pair of scissors.

The sad fact is that while we’re suspending children here for using imaginary weapons, there are people in the world who are raising children like this:

The dangerous parade of anti violence insanity continues

…and like this:

The dangerous parade of anti violence insanity continues

Violence in the world is a very unfortunate but also very real threat that our nation should always be prepared for.  Using political correctness to shield our kids from it isn’t doing them any favors.  Our kids need to understand that there is a clear right and wrong, good and evil.  And, God forbid, should they ever come face-to-face with that evil, I’d prefer they know where and for what they stand.