The Wall Street Journal recently reported:

A 2012 survey of more than 500 college graduates by Adecco, a human-resources organization, found that 8% of them had a parent accompany them to a job interview, and 3% had the parent sit in on the interview.

Meanwhile, some high-profile tech companies are turning the traditional “Bring Your Daughter/Son to Work Day” holiday on its head in a bid to boost morale.

LinkedIn Inc. will host its first “Bring In Your Parents Day” in November at its offices in 14 countries, and it plans to roll out how-to guides for businesses hoping to host similar events. Following a successful pilot in Dublin, spokeswoman Danielle Restivo expects the event to boost employee morale. Plus, she says, employees who have their parents’ backing are happier workers.

Still, the attention paid to parents has put some employers in an awkward position. “This is a situation that’s odd and uncomfortable to say the least,” says Jaime Fall, a vice president of the HR Policy Association.

On Tuesday, late-night comedian Jimmy Kimmel wondered what that would look like:

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