The Washington Post has a five-page profile on the rising TV star that is Fox News’s Megyn Kelly.

We pulled the best parts for you…

Kelly’s feelings on Sarah Palin are fuzzy: “She’s been on one time. And she made a lot of news. And she has a voice that doesn’t — that you don’t hear in many places. So there is a service provided in offering that occasionally. And that’s all I’ll say about that.”

Megyn Kelly profiled in Washington Post

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Bill O’Reilly says Kelly was “smart” to come to him for advice: “When Kelly first started [her new show], she came in and she was smart enough to ask me, ‘How do you drive an hour by yourself?’” O’Reilly says. “You can count on two hands who’s been successful at that. It’s very hard to drive an hour by yourself. I said, ‘Look, it’s all about the emotion of the day. You have to know what folks are talking about, and what they care about that day. So it can’t be all about you. It’s gotta be about them.’”

Her TV makeup routine is intense: The anchor who might beat Bill O’Reilly gets her eyelash extensions applied one at a time, with tweezers and dabs of glue, about 90 minutes before showtime, right after a motorized gun sprays foundation over her face, neck, shoulders, collarbone and sternum, wiping out a galaxy of light freckles…

She has sympathy, even if it’s sarcastic, for CNN’s Piers Morgan, her competition: “Poor Piers,” she says, as if she’s snatched the football away from her CNN competitor. She scrolls through an Excel spreadsheet of Nielsen ratings in her small office on News Corp’s 17th floor early last week. It’s near the close of business in midtown Manhattan, but Kelly’s workday is just beginning and, according to the numbers, she’s eating the competition for breakfast.

Her boss, Fox News CEO Roger Ailes, had some tough words for her at the start of her career: “I really thought I was fooling everybody into thinking I was this together. My words were chosen so perfectly and the script was done just right, and it wasn’t until [Ailes] said, ‘First of all, that’s bulls—, and second of all, the viewers can smell a phony a mile away,’ that I realized I was doing myself and my viewers a disservice.”

She enjoys the “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” movie: Moderation is a theme in Megyn Kelly’s favorite film, the 1971 “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,” a poster of which hangs prominently in her home. She loves the magic of it, the possibility of it, the I-can-change-my-life of it. She loves watching greedy little Veruca Salt disappear down the trash chute, another bad egg bound for justice.