Yesterday, Simon Sinek, author of a new book titled “Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’’t,” and previously the bestselling ”Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action,” discussed his business philosophy in an intriguing conversation on the Glenn Beck program, a clip of which you can watch below:

At Blaze Books [Facebook, Twitter], we compiled some of the most popular quotes on business and life from Sinek’s first book “Start With Why,” but today wanted to share some of the wisdom and insights from his new book “Leaders Eat Last.”

Below are seven of the most compelling quotes from Sinek’s new title based on Kindle’s popular highlights feature.

1. ”It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius.”

When trust and cooperation thrive internally, we pull together and the organization grows stronger
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2. ”Stress and anxiety at work have less to do with the work we do and more to do with weak management and leadership.”

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3. ”These exceptional organizations [like the military] all have cultures in which the leaders provide cover from above and the people on the ground look out for each other. This is the reason they are willing to push hard and take the kinds of risks they do. And the way any organization can achieve this is with empathy.”

4. ”Weak leaders are the ones who only extend the benefits of the Circle of Safety to their fellow senior executives and a chosen few others.”

5. ”Every single employee is someone’s son or someone’s daughter. Like a parent, a leader of a company is responsible for their precious lives.”

6. ”It is not the demands of the job that cause the most stress, but the degree of control workers feel they have throughout their day. The studies also found that the effort required by a job is not in itself stressful, but rather the imbalance between the effort we give and the reward we feel. Put simply: less control, more stress.”

7. ”When the people have to manage dangers from inside the organization, the organization itself becomes less able to face the dangers from outside. Truly human leadership protects an organization from the internal rivalries that can shatter a culture. When we have to protect ourselves from each other, the whole organization suffers. But when trust and cooperation thrive internally, we pull together and the organization grows stronger as a result.”

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