One of the key leaders in Egypt’s anti-government movement is continuing to make waves, suggesting that he could soon go from being an “agent of change” to the country’s next president. But what does that mean for Egypt and her allies?

In a new interview with Der Speigel, Mohamed ElBaradei suggests that the region may soon experience an “Arab spring,” and distances the policies of the Hosni Mubarak administration from the future of Egypt, including a peaceful past alliance with Israel. When asked specifically how a new government potentially including the controversial Muslim Brotherhood would affect Egypt’s relationship with Israel, ElBaradei said that Israelis need to understand it’s “impossible to make peace with a single man.”

“At the moment, they have a peace treaty with Mubarak, but not one with the Egyptian people,” El Baradei said. “The Israelis should understand that it is in their long-term interest to have a democratic Egypt as a neighbor, and that it is prudent to acknowledge the legitimate interests of the Palestinians and to grant them their own state.”

SPIEGEL: What should a new president change about Egypt’s relationship with Israel? Would you go to Israel to meet with Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel’s hard-line prime minister?

ElBaradei: I have already made earlier trips to Israel. But, when it comes to politics, I’m always much more concerned with the substance than the form. Of course conditions have to be made better for the people in the Gaza Strip, and the blockade needs to be lifted immediately. I always tell my Israeli friends: ‘It’s also in your security interest to treat the Palestinians as partners, to grant them rights and to not humiliate them.’

ElBaradei also dismissed speculation that he wants to step into the role of Egypt’s new president, but suggested he would not turn down the position if it were presented to him:

SPIEGEL: What should a new president change about Egypt’s relationship with Israel? Would you go to Israel to meet with Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel’s hard-line prime minister?

ElBaradei: I have already made earlier trips to Israel. But, when it comes to politics, I’m always much more concerned with the substance than the form. Of course conditions have to be made better for the people in the Gaza Strip, and the blockade needs to be lifted immediately. I always tell my Israeli friends: ‘It’s also in your security interest to treat the Palestinians as partners, to grant them rights and to not humiliate them.’

SPIEGEL: And, last but not least, do you think you will be Egypt’s next president?

ElBaradei: That’s not what I’m striving for. But if people’s expectations are directed toward me, I will also not disappoint them. I would like to remain independent and maintain a certain distance — both from the Muslim Brotherhood and US policy.

Click here for the full Der Spiegel interview.