Are These the 20 Signs That Point to a Global Food Crisis? On Sunday we heard the head of the World Bank say that he’s “concerned” about food prices, and that we’re “one shock away from a full-grown crisis.” Heavy stuff. But get ready, it’s about to get cinder-block-around-your-feet-in-a-lake heavy.

“In case you haven’t noticed, the world is on the verge of a horrific global food crisis,” writes Michael Snyder over at Zero Hedge. “At some point, this crisis will affect you and your family.  It may not be today, and it may not be tomorrow, but it is going to happen.”

In order to prove his case, Snyder provides “20 signs that a horrific global food crisis is coming.” The first seven are below:

#1 According to the World Bank, 44 million people around the globe have been pushed into extreme poverty since last June because of rising food prices.

#2 The world is losing topsoil at an astounding rate.  In fact, according to Lester Brown, “one third of the world’s cropland is losing topsoil faster than new soil is forming through natural processes”.

#3 Due to U.S. ethanol subsidies, almost a third of all corn grown in the United States is now used for fuel.  This is putting a lot of stress on the price of corn.

#4 Due to a lack of water, some countries in the Middle East find themselves forced to almost totally rely on other nations for basic food staples.  For example, it is being projected that there will be no more wheat production in Saudi Arabia by the year 2012.

#5 Water tables all over the globe are being depleted at an alarming rate due to “overpumping”.  According to the World Bank, there are 130 million people in China and 175 million people in India that are being fed with grain with water that is being pumped out of aquifers faster than it can be replaced.  So what happens once all of that water is gone?

#6 In the United States, the systematic depletion of the Ogallala Aquifercould eventually turn “America’s Breadbasket” back into the “Dust Bowl”.

#7 Diseases such as UG99 wheat rust are wiping out increasingly large segments of the world food supply.

You can read the next 13 here.

And just in case those facts aren’t heavy enough, CNBC opens its story on a potential U.S. “tipping point” like this:

The combination of rising gasoline prices and the steepest increase in the cost of food in a generation is threatening to push the US economy into a recession, according to Craig Johnson, president of Customer Growth Partners.