West Allis, WI police have released a statement saying that incidents at the Wisconsin State Fair, where many witnesses say large groups of black men attacked white fair patrons, will not be prosecuted as “hate crimes.” TMJ 4 reports on the new information released by police:

“The police department issued a statement with details of arrests, saying ‘None of these incidents possessed elements that would compel the pursuance of a ‘hate crime’ prosecution.”

Witnesses reported attacks on the opening night of the fair that seemed to be racially motivated with young African Americans beating up white fair goers, but police say at this point there is not enough evidence to support such claims.”

The Blaze reported Friday on the mayhem that ensued at Wisconsin State Fair on Thursday night. Here are some accounts of what witnesses claim to have experienced:

“I had a black couple on my right side, and these black kids were running in between all the cars, and they were pounding on my doors and trying to open up doors on my car, and they didn’t do one thing to this black couple that was in this car next to us. They just kept walking right past their car. They were looking in everybody’s windshield as they were running by, seeing who was white and who was black. Guarantee it.”

“I saw them grab this wide kid who was probably 14 or 15 years old.  They just flung him into the road.  They just jumped on him and started beating him.  They were kicking him.  He was on the ground.  A girl picked up a construction sign and pushed it over on top of him.  They were just running by and kicking him in the face.”

The Justice Department defines hate crime as the “violence of intolerance and bigotry, intended to hurt and intimidate someone because of their race, ethnicity, national origin, religious, sexual orientation, or disability.”

“The purveyors of hate use explosives, arson, weapons, vandalism, physical violence, and verbal threats of violence to instill fear in their victims, leaving them vulnerable to more attacks and feeling alienated, helpless, suspicious and fearful. Others may become frustrated and angry if they believe the local government and other groups in the community will not protect them. When perpetrators of hate are not prosecuted as criminals and their acts not publicly condemned, their crimes can weaken even those communities with the healthiest race relations.”

Do you think police made the right call in interpreting the motives of attackers at the Wisconsin State Fair Thursday night?