School Reading List Featured Books on Lesbian Sex, Gay Orgy

Most of us can remember many of the books on the assigned reading list in middle and high school — from Charles Dickens’ “Great Expectations” to Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s “Crime and Punishment.” Today, however, required reading for students apparently includes “Tweak: Growing up on Methamphetamines,” a book that features a scene depicting a homosexual orgy and “Norwegian Wood,” a book that features a sex scene between a 31-year-old woman and a 13-year old girl.

That’s right. Books on gay orgies and lesbian sex as required reading for students.

Fox Nation reports that a New Jersey school district has apologized to parents after requiring high school students to read the graphic books.

“Some of the language is inappropriate,” said Chuck Earling, superintendent of Monroe Township Schools in Williamstown, NJ. “We were not trying to create controversy. We were just trying to get students to read.”

Even more disturbing, is that the books reportedly on the required reading list were not just for high school students, but for middle school  students as well.

“There were some words and language that seemed to be inappropriate as far as the parents and some of the kids were concerned,” he said.

Fox adds:

One book, “Norwegian Wood,” was on a list for incoming sophomores in an honors English class. The book included a graphic depiction of a lesbian sex scene between a 31-year-old woman and a 13-year old girl, according to a report first published in the Gloucester County Times.

“I don’t think that’s relevant for any teenager,” parent Robin Myers told the newspaper. Her daughter was assigned to read the book.

“I was just kind of in shock,” she said.

The other book in question was “Tweak: Growing up on Methamphetamines.” That book included depictions of drug usage and a homosexual orgy.

“That has created a controversy,” Earling told Fox News Radio, referring to the drug usage – along with the lesbian and gay sex scenes. “We’ve pulled them from our summer reading list.”

In a misguided effort to keep ahead of the curve, school districts are substituting classic literature — that has served to educate millions of students for decades — with graphic books that are perhaps only intended to push a social and political agenda on the students who read them.

What say you?