Jimmy Hoffa may be firmly standing by his “take the son of a bitches out” call to political arms in Detroit on Monday, but not everyone wants to talk about it.

“Fox & Friends” anchor Gretchen Carlson tried gamely to get DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz to address to vitriol at the Obama Labor Day event.  The DNC Chair went into major avoidance mode.  Again and again:

Huffington Post:

Her appearance was ostensibly about Obama’s upcoming jobs announcement, but Carlson steered the conversation towards Hoffa.

“Some people are saying that that’s violent language, Congresswoman,” she said. Wasserman Schultz declined to comment.

“We need to make sure the we focus on the middle class and working families,” she said. “But wait a minute,” Carlson said. “[Hoffa said] ‘let’s take these sons of bitches out’…and that’s your response?”

“My response is that we should be working together,” Wasserman Schultz said, beginning to talk about jobs. Carlson cut her off.

“I’m talking about what Jimmy Hoffa said yesterday,” she said. “I know you’d like to focus on language–” Wasserman-Schultz replied.

“it was very serious language!” Carlson said. Wasserman Schultz actually laughed at this.

“Are you kidding me?” she said. “You take a walk with me through Tea Party rallies.” After more crosstalk, Wasserman Schultz turned her aim on Carlson.

“How many times have you called out coarse language at Tea Party rallies on this network. Almost never,” she said. “Plenty,” Carlson shot back. “I sit in the middle of the couch. I’m fair and balanced, Debbie. What is your response?”

Give Carlson credit for trying…CNN’s John King actually had Hoffa on as a guest last night and didn’t even ask about the remarks!

Mediate:

Hoffa appeared on John King USA to discuss the labor movement and the Tea Party’s place in it after his speech today– from which the controversial clip was played to introduce the guest. But that was where any discussion of the rhetoric ended, and instead King turned to President Obama’s rhetoric, and asked whether Hoffa was satisfied with the more fiery tone exhibited today. He was, and he explained that, to him, “there really is no dealing with the Tea Party– you can’t be reasonable with people that are unreasonable.” He suggested he didn’t see any “middle ground” and the voters who had given the Tea Party strength in Congress were likely regretting it. “I think people are aware now that this group is after them,” he contended, via their opposition to significant funding for entitlement programs.