Saudi Academics Say Women Driving Would Lead to No More Virginity

In 2011, some brave Saudi Arabian women put up a fight over the ongoing driving ban that exists in the Middle Eastern country, but their battle is far from over. Now, religious scholars from Saudi Arabia’s highest authority on Islam are claiming that allowing women to drive would lead to further “moral decline.”

But it gets even more bizarre. Academics in the Majlis al-Ifta’ al-A’ala council claim that making such an allowance would lead to a “surge in prostitution, pornography, homosexuality and divorce.” Yes, that’s right. By affording women the right to move about more freely, society, in their view, would nearly collapse.

Oh — and even worse: The kingdom could be left with “no more virgins” within 10 years if women are allowed to get behind the wheel. Islamic academics worked with with Kamal Subhi, a former professor at King Fahd University, to complete the report. It was prepared for the Shura Council, the nation’s legislative assembly.

Saudi Academics Say Women Driving Would Lead to No More Virginity

The Telegraph has more regarding the odd — almost unbelievable — nature of the report:

It pointed out that “moral decline” could already be seen in those other Muslim countries in which women are allowed to drive.

In the report Prof Subhi described sitting in a coffee shop in an unnamed Arab state where “all the women were looking at me”.

“One made a gesture that made it clear that she was available,” he said. “This is what happens when women are allowed to drive.”

In May, The Blaze brought you the story of Manal al-Sharif, a Saudi woman who launched a campaign against the kingdom’s driving ban. Al-Sharif posted a video of herself driving on both Facebook and YouTube to encourage others to join her in opposing the ban.

In September, another woman — Shaima Ghassaniya — was found guilty of driving without the government’s permission. While she was condemned to have 10 lashes for her purported actions, the government inevitably overturned the sentence.

Below, watch a video that explains activists’ past attempts to overturn the ban:

Needless to say, this report is likely to further hamper equal rights in Saudi Arabia, as the nation has worked to diligently to decline women of the most basic freedoms (it is the only country in the world that does not allow women to drive).

Apparently, the government is considering an even more intense anti-female proposal that would command that women who have “tempting” eyes cover them up.