Bill OReilly Says Ron Pauls Foreign Policy Views Disqualify Him

There’s no doubt that Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul has his fans — and his foes.

It is the Texas congressman’s stances on international affairs and national security that often create angst or support (depending on individual opinions on the matter) among members of the electorate.

Paul’s foreign policy views have led Fox News host Bill O’Reilly to claim that the presidential contender isn’t qualified to assume the American presidency. This morning, O’Reilly appeared on NBC’s Today Show to chat about his new book “Killing Lincoln” and to share his take on the GOP field. When asked to comment on Paul, he held little back.

(Related: Rush Limbaugh Blasts Ron Paul for His Stance on Iran)

“His foreign policy disqualifies him in my eyes as an American — not as a journalist,” O’Reilly said. “I don’t think we need another Neville Chamberlain with Iran. So, he wants to be friends with Iran, that’s swell.”

Watch O’Reilly discuss Paul, among other candidates, below (his comments on Paul are at 4:19):

Arthur Neville Chamberlain, of course, was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 until 1940. He was known for his appeasement in addressing foreign policy issues. BBC offers up a little of the history behind Champerlain’s appeasement:

Like many in Britain who had lived through World War One, Chamberlain was determined to avert another war. His policy of appeasement towards Adolf Hitler culminated in the Munich Agreement in which Britain and France accepted that the Czech region of the Sudetenland should be ceded to Germany.

Chamberlain left Munich believing that by appeasing Hitler he had assured ‘peace for our time’. However, in March 1939 Hitler annexed the rest of the Czech lands of Bohemia and Moravia, with Slovakia becoming a puppet state of Germany. Five months later in September 1939 Hitler’s forces invaded Poland. Chamberlain responded with a British declaration of war on Germany.

The comparison, though uttered with an appropriate tone and delivery, is certainly not a compliment.

(H/T: Mediaite)

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