Some pictures have started to make their way around the internet today showing a sniper nest at Sunday’s Super Bowl. They feature a state-of-the-art rifle set up in a box high above the field. But now the question is: Are the pictures real? The answer: it seems that way.

The pictures were posted on the Facebook page of U.S. Tactical Supply Inc. in the album “Super Bowl 2012 Security Overwatch.” They boast about some of the gear seen in the pictures, including the tripod:

Sniper Pictures From Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis

Sniper Pictures From Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis

Sniper Pictures From Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis

Sniper Pictures From Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis

So are they real?

Robert Johnson over at Business Insider thinks it’s a good possibility. He called the tactical company which told him the pictures were taken by Alamo Four Star, which manufactures the tripod seen in the photos. He also notes that Jerry Jones — owner of the Dallas Cowboys who hosted the Super Bowl last year — admitted to them being present in 2011:

And even Hollywood star Ashton Kutcher captured video of them in 2009:

So it does seem plausible, but we’re waiting on confirmation. In the meantime, a raucous debate is occurring over on the U.S. Tactical Supply Facebook page about whether the sniper pictures create a sense of safety or if they are too big brother:

Sniper Pictures From Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis

Curious about the rifle you’re seeing? That’s apparently the XM 2010 custom 700 Remington.* Head over to Business Insider to read more about it and get updates to the story.

UPDATE:

Johnson is now reporting that the president of Alamo Four Star is saying the pictures are the “real deal.” He got them from a member of the Indianapolis  SWAT member. Check out his story for more.

Editor’s note: Business Insider has updated its story to note that the rifle is not an XM 2010, but rather a custom Remington 700. Blaze reader Ben writes that it’s actually “a custom built Remington action and barrel that’s in an XLR Industries chassis system,” and it’s the product of Kyle Miller who works on the western slope of Colorado.