Miracle Whip has long made debatable advertising choices, seemingly trying to turn a kitchen condiment into the emblem of a social movement.

Back in 2009, comedian Steven Colbert spoofed their edgy, “We Are Miracle Whip and We Will Not Tone It Down” advertisement in a clip titled, “The Mayo-lution Will Not Be Televised.”

Watch it below:

And now, Miracle Whip seems to be jumping on the Occupy Wall Street bandwagon with an advertisement saying, “Keep an Open Mouth,“ and ”Join the Cause,” with the all too-familiar socialist fist clutching a bottle of Miracle Whip.

Advertising Fail: Miracle Whip Seemingly Embracing the Socialist Fist

(Photo: Miracle Whip)

Miracle Whip’s website is running similar video ads that may or may not have political undertones.

For instance, in one of the advertisements a group of towns-people with torches and pitchforks (tea partiers?) are stirred into a frenzy over a bottle of Miracle Whip.  They describe the bottle as having “red markings.”

Then, a level-headed girl tells them: “perhaps you should try it before making such wicked accusations,” and the “Keep an Open Mouth” slogan follows.

Responses have ranged from mocking to incredulous.

One blogger said of Mayo’s advertising choices:

Mayonnaise, the average person would agree, should not be used as a thick, fattening conduit for the voice of a generation….“Don’t eat the egg salad Janine brought, she buys her food from THE MAN!”

I don’t care how organic or special or real or hardcore you think your s**t is. It’s MAYO!!! Nobody dips their fist in it and then walks around with their sticky digits held high up in the air crying “Death to Capitalism!” It just doesn’t happen.

Others remarked:

Frankly, this is not cool.  Would Miracle Whip run a  campaign with DNC, GOP, or Nazi imagery? No. So why Socialist? MarketingFail.

Miracle Whip’s slogan is “keep an open mouth”…I see where they were going but I refuse to ignore the immense double entendre.

What do you think of the ads?  Are they a clever way to appeal to the “Occupy” crowd, or are they an embarrassing marketing ploy?