Progressive & Conservative Evangelicals Seek Common Ground at Q Conference in D.C.The sixth annual Q Conference opens today in Washington, D.C. The initiative, headed by Gabe Lyons, is an effort to provide a platform for both progressive and conservative evangelical leaders (among others) to lay out their plans for a more prosperous Christian body — and world.

Q, a non-profit organization based in New York City, describes itself as “a place leaders can explore what that might look like and how God’s intention is showing up in the lives of their peers and the cultural projects they create.”

This, of course, means that a diverse set of Christian ideals are considered when it comes to tackling issues pertaining to sin in the world. So conservatives like Richard Land and liberals like Jim Wallis will be sharing the same stage, but will likely be illustrating very different ideals. Still, they will be seeking out areas of agreement.

In fact, according to the Sojourners web site, Wallis and Land will be appearing on stage together for a special, moderated discussion:

Jim Wallis, President and CEO of Sojourners, and Dr. Richard Land, President of The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, will engage in a lively moderated conversation about the important issues that are at stake in the 2012 presidential election. While Wallis and Land often hold opposing political opinions, this dialogue will reveal some surprising common ground between these Christian thought leaders.

While the event, which mirrors a TED forum of sorts, is going on through Wednesday, you can watch the first part of today’s morning session, below:

Religion News Service has more about the event and its intentions:

With 700 participants gathered in a stately downtown auditorium, Lyons will play host to a distinct kind of Christian conference, one that seeks a respectful, constructive conversation on a host of issues confronting the nation.

Q, which stands for “question,” will allow 30 different culture leaders — from New York Times columnist David Brooks to Florida megachurch pastor Joel Hunter — to present their ideas for the common good during a two-and-a-half day confab.

“We feel we have a role to play in renewing the culture and holding back the effects of sin,” Lyons, who says he created Q after realizing how little Americans respect Christianity, proclaimed. “We’re not to do it in an antagonistic way. We hope to do it in a hopeful way that gives witness to the rest of the world in how things ought to be.”

Here’s the second part of the morning session:

Each of the 30 individuals invited to present are given three, nine or 18 minutes to state their position. Then, conference participants who are seated at tables, discuss what they’ve heard during each address.

The opening day of the Q Conference can be viewed free of charge via video stream from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and from 7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET. The embedded, live channel is also available, below:

(H/T: Religion News Service)