When a rumor about free government money being given away attracted 60,000 people in Michigan back in in November of 2009, Glenn Beck reported it on his Fox News show:

With each passing day, it seems the allegations surrounding the alleged Secret Service prostitution scandal are getting worse. For example, we are now learning that some of the prostitutes reportedly used in Colombia may have been underage, and that the agents also may have compromised Obama’s security by inviting outsiders into their room where copies of the president’s schedule were likely located.

Ronald Kessler, who helped break the story, told Newsmax (where he is employed) that the age of the alleged prostitutes will be scandalous:

Investigators probing the Secret Service prostitute scandal are looking into whether any of the girls involved were underage, Ronald Kessler, the journalist who broke the story, tells Newsmax.TV exclusively.

Kessler warned that more scandalous details of the Colombian cavorting are still to come, including the age of the prostitutes.

That comes as NBC has news that a security breach could have taken place. According to the network, each member is given a copy of the president’s schedule, and having outsiders in the room could have compromised that information:

The source also said the incident raised the possibility of a potential security breach, telling NBC News that all Secret Service personnel had been given copies of the president’s schedule, which they are told to lock up in a safe in their hotel rooms.

The fallout for all this is now hitting Mark Sullivan, head of the Secret Service. Kessler believes the lax security during the Obama years can be traced back to Sullivan, and he believes Sullivan does not have the ability to lead the agency:

Those critiques are especially harsh considering what Kessler believes could have happened:

“These are not just little errors,” Kessler said, adding that consorting with prostitutes could easily lead to blackmail, which could put the president at risk.

[...]

He said the prostitutes could have blackmailed the men and that could have led to a foreign power such as Russia being able to plant bugging devices in presidential limousines or even the White House.

“This is the way things work,” said Kessler. “It doesn’t have to be something that is carried out right away. It could be carried out six months later. But that’s why you have requirements that they conduct themselves appropriately and when someone wants top-secret clearance, they never get into a compromised position.”

He said it is possible that there could even be an upside to the whole scandal.

“If it leads to reform of the Secret Service, it would be a plus, but I doubt that will happen. I’m afraid that it will take another assassination before the proper steps are taken to reform the Secret Service.”

Kessler said he has no doubt that the agents involved will lose their jobs.

“They will be fired, and there is no question that that is the proper punishment,” he added. “To embarrass the president like this and to put themselves in jeopardy of being blackmailed is so over the line.”

But Congressman Peter King says this is no time to oust Sullivan, based on what is known so far about the recall of 11 agents from Colombia.

The New York Republican also tells NBC’s “Today” show Tuesday that Sullivan “acted immediately” and says he thinks “it’s wrong to be prejudging Mark Sullivan.”

But King also says, quote, “It looks like we really lucked out on this,” telling NBC it appears agents compromised presidential security with the partying that occurred in Colombia before President Barack Obama arrived for his summit in Cartagena, Colombia.

King says, “You don’t allow a potential enemy into your security zone.”

The agents involved have now reportedly lost their security clearances.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.