By now, Blaze readers are likely familiar with the controversy surrounding rock legend Ted Nugent, who spoke out candidly against the administration during an appearance at the recent NRA conference. In particular, DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz bore the brunt of Nugent’s scorn, but he had some choice words for the administration as well. Needless to say, his remarks went over like a lead zeppelin with leftists, and as a result, the longtime rocker is now being investigated by the Secret Service — the same agency whose members were recently dismissed for allegedly engaging the services of Cartagenian prostitutes.

Glenn Beck, noting the irony, dedicated a portion of his Wednesday evening broadcast to defending someone who he considers an American patriot, a man of faith, a responsible steward of the land and simply, an over all “good, decent man.”  

If Nugent is on the Secret Service’s radar, Beck asked if the agency also plans to interrogate members of Occupy Wall Street, Louis Farrakhan and the New Black Panthers, all of whom have overtly called for physical violence. Yet, as Beck pointed out, while Hezbollah “gets cozy” with Julian Assange on Russia Today, Warren Buffett’s corruption intensifies, and GSA’s lavish clown-filled team building exercise comes under fire, it is somehow more important to probe Ted Nugent.

Rather, Beck suggested the president send someone to investigate his own Secret Service in the wake of its scandal rather than interrogate The Motor City Madman (as Nugent is dubbed) famed for crooning such melodies as “Wang Dang Sweet Poontang” and “Cat Scratch Fever.”

Is he a danger to anyone? “Not unless people in Washington start to sprout antlers and Ted is given a hunting license.”

Beck said he understand why Secret Service takes anything that could be construed a threat against the president seriously, and wouldn’t have it any other way, however, Nugent’s comment “wasn’t even directed toward the President.” Instead, Nugent followed up his impassioned remarks with a plea for people to head to the polls in November and get out the vote. Beck asked how many people love the constitution the way Ted Nugent does.

A patriot

During a recent event in which Beck had the occasion to meet with wives of fallen Navy SEALs, emotions were running high, but Nugent arrived with his “heart of gold” and put everyone at ease. Beck said that upon observing Nugent’s congenial way with these fallen soldiers wives, he just fell back and “basked in the glow” of a good man who has the ability to touch people’s hearts. Later, in the greenroom, a tearful Nugent relayed a powerful incident to Beck.

To illustrate the kind of patriot he believes Nugent to be, Beck relayed this very story to viewers and it undoubtedly shocks all who have heard it told.

Nugent had learned that a fallen SEAL, Chris Campbell, had formally willed that Nugent perform at his memorial should he be killed in service. The 36-year-old husband and father died when his helicopter was shot down over Afghanistan. He and 29 others were lost.

Upon learning of Campbell’s passing, Nugent put all other plans on hold, rearranged his schedule, chartered a private jet and started to make his way to honor this serviceman, when, just before boarding his plane, received a phone call saying that “someone high up” in the military did not want him present.

Beck thought it difficult to imagine who would have the nerve to disrespect the final wish of a fallen Navy SEAL.

This was only one instance underscoring Nugent’s sense of community, service and patriotism. Yet somehow, Ted Nugent, a law enforcement officier himself, is who the administration has its eye on for investigation?