PUERTO VALLARTA, Mexico (Newscore) — An angler who reeled in a world-record yellowfin tuna off the coast of Mexico has had his catch disqualified — because a deckhand touched his fishing pole as he fought the mighty fish.

Fisherman Reels in Record Breaking Fish But Disqualified After Deckhand Touched the Rod

Record-breaking tuna doesn't take home world title because someone touched the fishing rod. (Photo: Danny Osuna via Facebook)

Robert Pedigo hooked the 427.9-pound (194-kilogram) fish last Thursday and fought it for a half-hour before bringing it aboard the “Journeyman.”

But everyone on board agreed that Danny Osuna, a local captain working that day as a deckhand, blew the record by touching Pedigo’s pole during the battle between man and beast off the coast of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

The rules say an angler cannot have any help to reel in a fish if he or she wants to make history.

“I do this for a living and we’re really hardcore fishermen,” Osuna told FOXNews.com. “We have caught a lot of fish in the high 300s, but this is the first time we’ve caught something like this.”

Fisherman Reels in Record Breaking Fish But Disqualified After Deckhand Touched the Rod

(Photo: Danny Osuna via Facebook)

Osuna admitted touching Pedigo’s fishing rod, disqualifying the catch from consideration by the International Game Fish Association. But he said Pedigo, who could not be reached for comment, was not too broken up about the technicality.

“We’re fine with that,” Osuna said. “Actually, we never even thought the fish would be that big.”

Osuna said everyone who was in on the fishing trip got a big meal out of the monstrous catch before the rest was given away. “We never sold the fish,” he said.

An IGFA spokesman confirmed to FOXNews.com that the all-tackle record for yellowfin tuna remains 405 pounds (184 kilograms), caught by Mike Livingston near Baja Sur, Mexico — because Osuna touched the rod.

“No one (to my knowledge) has been contacted by the angler or any member of the crew in regards to this catch,” IGFA world record coordinator Jack Vitek wrote in an email. “We have heard of the catch on various fishing forums and websites, and are pleased to hear that the angler and crew are being up front about such an impressive catch, and are respecting the IGFA rules.”