Muskets. Beer bottles. An anchor. Oh my.

These are just some of the contents revealed in a recent exploration to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Texas where a team has found what is considered an unknown sunken ship.

NOAA Researchers Spend 56 Days Exploring Mysterious Sunken Ship in Gulf of Mexico

(Photo: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program via National Geographic)

NOAA Researchers Spend 56 Days Exploring Mysterious Sunken Ship in Gulf of Mexico

A Venus fly-trap anemone on top of decomposing muskets. (Photo: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program via National Geographic)

NOAA Researchers Spend 56 Days Exploring Mysterious Sunken Ship in Gulf of Mexico

Researchers will use the dish style to try and date the origin and era of the ship. (Photo: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program via National Geographic)

NOAA Researchers Spend 56 Days Exploring Mysterious Sunken Ship in Gulf of Mexico

ROV descending upon the anchor of the ship. (Photo: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program via National Geographic)

National Geographic reports researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management were first alerted to the potential of something down there while sonar was being used in a 2011 search for oil.

The researchers officially found the 80-foot long vessel during a 56 day expedition in the gulf. It is thought to have sunk as long as 200 years ago.

According to National Geographic, maritime archaeologist Frank Cantelas said they have not yet determined any more historical information about the ship, but, given the presence of muskets and cannons, they think it could have been a privateer. Cantelas says he thinks it could have been involved in the War of 1812 or the Mexican-American War from 1846 to 1848.