The media has been pounded in recent days after several blatantly obvious attempts to spin the national narrative were identified and condemned.

On Monday, for instance, MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell took Mitt Romney wildly out of context to make it seem like he’s never been to a particular convenience store when he was really making a comparison between the public and private sectors, and on Tuesday, a Bloomberg article allegedly left the comment, “(OK?–I’M MAKING THIS UP)” in the text when it was published.

Michelle Malkin grabbed a screen shot:

Bloomberg Article by Eric Martin and Nacha Cattan Accidentally Leaves (OK?  IM MAKING THIS UP) in at Publication

Excerpt of Bloomberg article "Calderon Fetes G-20 as Sun Sets on Mexican Ruling Party’s Power"

In case you missed it, the comment is in the second-to-last paragraph, in all caps.  However, it has since been removed from the original article.

Now, while conservative media outlets are claiming this is proof the rest of the media “makes up” its information– are they really lying about what the chairman of Saab AB had to say?  Perhaps they really are pathological liars, or perhaps it’s just a note the authors, Eric Martin and Nacha Cattan, left for themselves/the editor.  You decide.

Either way, it’s a pretty embarrassing editorial mistake on Bloomberg‘s part.

UPDATE:

The original Bloomberg article now includes this note: “(Corrects original story published June 19 to delete extraneous editor’s note from paragraph seven. See GMEET for more on the Los Cabos summit.)”

Ty Trippet, Bloomberg News spokesman, emailed The Blaze:

“The story was published with an editor’s note to the reporter that he was
rewriting the paragraph and was meant for the reporter to check its accuracy.
While the paragraph is accurate and we stand by the reporting, the
editor’s choice of words was unfortunate shorthand.  As soon as we were aware
this happened, we issued a correction to show that the extraneous language was
removed.  We take transparency and accuracy very seriously and appreciate the
opportunity to improve our internal editing practices.”

(H/T: Michelle Malkin)