Islamist protesters stormed the U.S. Embassy in Egypt’s capital Tuesday, destroyed the American flag, and replaced it with a black Islamist flag to protest a U.S.-produced film depicting the Prophet Muhammad.

Get that? They destroyed the U.S. flag and replaced it with a flag similar to the one used by Al-Qaeda — all on the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

How did the U.S. embassy respond? By apologizing to the rioters for hurting “their religious feelings“:

The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims — as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions. Today, the 11th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, Americans are honoring our patriots and those who serve our nation as the fitting response to the enemies of democracy. Respect for religious beliefs is a cornerstone of American democracy. We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of others

So, on the 11th anniversary of 9/11, rioting Egyptians stormed the American embassy, destroyed our flag, and hoisted the Islamist flag — and the U.S. embassy apologizes for hurting their feelings?

If this shocks you, you are not alone. Many Americans expressed their outrage on Twitter and other social mediums.

Conservative columnist Charles Krauthammer was also disgusted by the embassy’s response.

“That statement is an embarrassment,” Krauthammer said during Tuesday’s broadcast of Fox News’ “Special Report With Bret Baier.”

“That’s a hostage statement. That’s a mob of Al-Qaeda sympathizers in Egypt forcing the United States into making a statement essentially of apology — on 9/11 of all days — for something of which we are not responsible. I would issue a statement saying to the mob, ‘Go to hell,’” he added.


Krauthammer wasn’t finished.

“The way America works, the way a democracy works, is that everybody has a right to express themselves. We don’t police our speech and you ought to apologize to the United States for storming an embassy and the violation of the ultimate sacred principle of democracy, which is protecting embassies and missions abroad,” he said.

“For the U.S. to, what, essentially, issue a veiled apology, I think is disgraceful,” he added.

Oh, and one last thing: Remember when 26 Coptic Christian protesters were murdered by unruly crowds and Egyptian soldiers in 2011? As the Washington Free Beacon reminds us, the same U.S. embassy issued the following statement:

We are deeply concerned by the violence between demonstrators and security forces in Cairo October 9, which resulted in a number of deaths among both sides.  We express our condolences to their families and loved ones. We note Prime Minister Sharaf’s call for an investigation, and appeal to all parties to remain calm.

Contrary to press reports, the U.S. has made no offers to send troops to protect Coptic places of worship in Egypt.

Follow Becket Adams (@BecketAdams) on Twitter

(H/T: TheDC)