EPA Email Honors Hispanic Heritage Month With Che Guevara & Plagiarized Message

(Source: BuzzFeed)

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) circulated an internal email to agency employees that included an image of Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara and a plagiarized fact-sheet about Hispanic culture from Buzzle.com. The internal email was obtained by BuzzFeed.

The picture included in the email shows a horse and carriage passing a billboard sign with Guevara’s face plastered on it, alongside the words “Hasta La Victoria Siempre,” meaning “Until Victory Always/Forever” — one of the revolutionary’s famous sayings.

“Hispanic people are vibrant, socializing and fun loving people. Among various facts associated to this culture is that they have a deep sense of involvement in their family traditions and cultures,” the email states.

It goes on: “Hispanics are generally formal in their treatments and a firm handshake is a common practice between people. A light kiss on cheek and hug are also common forms of greeting close acquaintances, family members and friends.”

But as BuzzFeed points out, all of the text and the image were seemingly plagiarized word-for-word — without any attribution — from the website buzzle.com.

However, one could argue that plagiarism is the least of the EPA’s concerns. Though Che Guevara is revered by some as a pop culture icon in the United States, the Argentine-born Marxist revolutionary’s real story is more sinister than some would like to admit.

Che Guevara, also known as Ernesto Guevara, joined Fidel Castro and his “26th July Movement” in 1955 to overthrow the Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista, of which they were eventually successful in 1959. During the duo’s vicious campaign to implement communism in Latin American countries, Guevara trained and directed firing squads that executed thousands of men, women and children. While the total death count is uncertain, no one can argue that he was not ruthless in his quest for “justice.”

EPA Email Honors Hispanic Heritage Month With Che Guevara & Plagiarized Message

Supporters of deposed Honduran president Manuel Zelaya dance behind a huge flag of Argentine-Cuban guerrilla Ernesto Che Guevara during a demonstration in front of the National Congress in Tegucigalpa on November 7, 2009. (AFP/Getty Images)

“I feel my nostrils dilate savoring the acrid smell of gunpowder and blood of the enemy,” he reportedly once said. Guevara was reportedly captured and executed by Bolivian special forced in 1967.

Needless to say, a murderous Marxist revolutionary isn’t exactly the type of person the United States government should be celebrating during Hispanic Heritage Month or any other month for that matter.

Read the entire EPA internal email from BuzzFeed.com:

 

To: OSWER Everyone, OPP ALL, Eugene Green/DC/USEPA/US@EPA, ORD-NCER
From: Susie Goldring/DC/USEPA/US
Date: 09/13/2012 02:51PM
Subject: Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic news you can use!

Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries—Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico declared its independence on September 16, and Chile on September 18.
Over the past decades, the Hispanic population in the USA has shown tremendous rise. For the uninitiated, Hispanics are people who have origins related to the country Spain. In the recent years, the term Hispanics is also used to categorize a larger group of population in the US who originally belonged to the nations ruled by Spain.

Besides that, various parts of Central and Southern American countries, Mexico and even Philippines have cultures related to the Spanish origin. ‘Latinos’ or Latin Americans and people with Portuguese origin are also an integral part of Hispanic culture and traditions. California, Texas, New York, and Florida are the four states that constitute more than 70% of the total Hispanic population in the US. One of the most simple Hispanics culture facts is that majority of the Hispanic population speaks Spanish language.

Hispanic Culture in the United States
Hispanic people are vibrant, socializing and fun loving people. Among various facts associated to this culture is that they have a deep sense of involvement in their family traditions and cultures.

Family Bonding
In Hispanic families, there is a culture of living in closely knit groups that not only contains grandfathers and grandchildren but all generations whose descendants are alive. In most of the families, father acts as a chief of the family while mother works as a housewife. All adults and working individuals in Hispanic family realize the importance of work and they make efforts to help other family members in times of need that may be related to education, health and other requirements. The family ties are strengthened by traveling to relatives places and homes during vacations and holidays. Relatives and acquaintances are given lot of care and respect.

General Manners
Hispanics are generally formal in their treatments and a firm handshake is a common practice between people. A light kiss on cheek and hug are also common forms of greeting close acquaintances, family members and friends. When Hispanics are addressing someone with informal words, generally they are very fast, loud and use a lot of body language gestures to convey their points.

To read the rest of the EPA email at BuzzFeed, click here.