In his weekly column for the “Las Vegas Review-Journal,” writer Glenn Cook has been examining the problems of voter fraud, including felons, the deceased, and noncitizens registering to vote and casting ballots.

This weekend, he wrote about two such noncitizens who tell him they were pressured by their union, Culinary Local 226, to illegally register to vote and then cast ballots. Fearing reprisal from the union and deportation by immigration authorities, the two spoke to Cook as long as he agreed not to identify them. While they speak a modicum of English, the two say they didn’t understand the forms they were completing. He writes:

They say the Culinary official who registered them to vote didn’t tell them what they were signing and didn’t ask whether they were citizens. The immigrants said they trusted that the union official’s request was routine, thought nothing of it and went about their work.

Then the election drew closer. Then the Culinary canvassers started seeking them out and ordering them to go vote.

One of the immigrants was visited at home by a Culinary representative and said the operative made threats of deportation if no ballot was cast.

They didn’t understand how, as noncitizens, they could be registered to vote if it’s illegal for them to vote in a U.S. election. They didn’t understand that, upon being signed up, not only is their registration public record, but the record of whether they’ve voted is public as well.

Cook writes: “One of the immigrants validated my worst fears about Nevada’s weak voter registration standards and voting safeguards,” telling the reporter “There are others,” that is, other noncitizens in the union that are registered to vote. He writes:

The question, now that early voting is over and Election Day is just two days away, is how many of these ineligible voters have done the Culinary’s bidding and submitted ballots, whether out of ignorance or fear, and how many have the knowledge and courage to follow the law and stay away from the polls.

In Nevada you never have to prove you’re a citizen to register to vote or cast a ballot. Forget about showing government-issued photo identification at the polls, as several states now require. You don’t have to show a photo ID at any point in the process. The immigrants I met could vote Tuesday just by showing a Culinary health insurance card and a power bill.

Cook asked Yvanna Cancela, political director for the Culinary Local 226, about the allegations.

“This is very, very serious,” she said. “No one would train anyone to register noncitizens or threaten registered voters in any way.”

She said if a noncitizen were registered to vote by accident, and if they told a Culinary canvasser they weren’t eligible to vote, canvassers are trained to have the person fill out a form to revoke their registration with the county. That form is immediately submitted to the county.

Cook reminds his readers of the serious and very real implications of fraudulent voting. Nevada is a battleground state that not only can decide who is elected president of the United States but could also hold the key to a Democratic or Republican majority in the Senate.

Providing more insight into the issue of noncitizen and illegal alien participation in the election process, Matthew Vadum of FrontPage Magazine writes about the extensive get-out-the-vote effort being waged by illegals largely for the benefit of Democrats. In his Monday article titled Obama’s Army of Illegal Election Workers, Vadum writes:

Democrats have enlisted thousands of young illegal immigrants to drag their supporters to the polls on Election Day tomorrow.

These get-out-the-vote workers may or may not be breaking the law by helping with voter mobilization. Because the workers are already unlawfully present in the United States, presumably all employment they engage in –including electioneering— already violates laws against unauthorized employment.

He cites a story in the Wall Street Journal examining the issue, which said:

Thousands of illegal-immigrant youths are at the forefront of national efforts to get immigrant and Latino citizens to the polls next week, the latest demonstration of the increasingly organized and vocal group’s power.

In swing states like Florida, Ohio and Colorado, the young people—often referred to as Dreamers after the failed Dream Act legislation that would have offered them a path to citizenship—are running phone banks, going door to door and approaching students on college campuses to encourage voting. They also are active in California, a Democratic stronghold, and Texas, where Republicans have the edge.

Dan Stein, president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform which favors limits on immigration levels tells Vadum: “For people who aren’t supposed to be in the country in the first place to be deployed for partisan advantage is the last straw.”

“’The strategic deployment’ of illegal immigrants who benefit from the Obama administration program is a ‘corruption of the political process,’” he said.

(H/T: FrontPage Magazine)