Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) announced earlier this month that he may take the unusual step of using a simple majority vote to limit filibusters. Yes, Sen. Reid may take steps to limit filibusters, the one recourse parties in the minority have to hold up legislation they oppose.

“Minority parties in the Senate use filibusters — parliamentary delays — to slow or kill legislation. They can only be ended by 60 votes — a margin neither party can achieve without some cooperation from the other side,” the Associated Press notes.

Democrats accuse Republicans of abusing filibusters while Republicans say they have no choice because Reid blocks them from presenting amendments. The Nevada senator, in turn, says Republicans use too much time pushing amendments that “make political statements or that are designed to derail bills,” the AP notes.

“Reid’s plan would forbid the use of filibusters when a bill is initially being brought to the Senate floor for debate and require filibustering senators to actually be on the Senate floor, a long-abandoned practice,” the report adds.

Huh. That’s funny. You know, as Buzzfeed’s Andrew Kaczynski reminds us, there was a time (2005, to be specific) when Sen. Reid totally loved the filibuster and defended it from attempts to reform it:

Screen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from ReformScreen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from Reform

Screen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from ReformScreen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from ReformScreen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from ReformScreen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from ReformScreen Grabs Show Sen. Harry  Reid Repeatedly Defended the Filibuster from ReformOddly enough, the above statements have disappeared from the Nevada senator’s website.

Weird, right?

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The Associated Press contributed to this report. Featured image courtesy Getty Images.