The popularity of 3D printers for use by the average person is predicted to revolutionize how everyday items are made. Much of what we’ve seen printed using such devices has been small — medical prosthetics, guns, Stephen Colbert’s head – but a Dutch architect is embarking on a much bigger 3D printed project.

According to BBC, the Holland-based architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars is working with 3D printing expert Enrico Dini to create a building that essentially “has no beginning and no end.”

This is how the “landscape house” is described on Universe Architecture’s website:

One surface folded in an endless möbius band. Floors transform into ceilings, inside into outside. Production with innovative 3D printing techniques. Architecture of continuity with an endless array of applicability.

Although the material produced by the 3D printer for the house is described as a “marble-like material” that is stronger than cement, BBC reported that the structure would still require traditional concrete support.

Here’s what Ruijssenaars had to say about the project to BBC:

“3D printing is amazing,” he told the BBC.

“For me as an architect it’s been a nice way to construct this specific design – it has no beginning and no end and with the 3D printer we can make it look like that.

“In traditional construction you have to make a [mold] of wood and you fill it with concrete and then you take out the wood – it’s a waste of time and energy.

“You can print what you want – it’s a more direct way of constructing.”

Watch this video showing the the concept for the landscape house:

The first houses are expected to be completed by 2014. Ruijssenaars told BBC museums and some private individuals have expressed interest in the landscape house, which is estimated to cost between $5.33-6.66 million.

Related:

(H/T: SlashGear)