Rape survivor Amanda Collins bravely spoke about her horrific attack during a Monday legislative hearing concerning Colorado’s proposed ban on concealed firearms on college campuses. She explained how she wished she would’ve had a firearm to defend herself from her rapist, which could have possibly prevented the attack from occurring.

After calling her story “unsettling,” Democratic state Sen. Evie Hudak quickly went after Collins, saying “actually, statistics are not on your side, even if you had a gun.”

“You said that you were a martial arts student, I mean person, experienced in Tae Kwon Do, and yet because this individual was so large, was able to overcome you even with your skills, and chances are that if you had had a gun, then he would have been able to get that from you and possibly use it against you,” she added.

Hudak claimed that for every one woman who used a handgun to kill someone in self-defense, 83 were murdered by them.

“Respectfully senator, you weren’t there,” Collins said before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. “Had I been carrying concealed, he wouldn’t have known I had my weapon; and I was there. I know without a doubt in my mind at some point I would’ve been able to stop my attack by using my firearm.”

Republican state Sen. Ted Harvey took a shot at Democrats’ gun control efforts, telling Collins that the point of Colorado’s proposed ban on firearms on campus is to make sure people aren’t “uncomfortable.”

“How does rendering me defenseless protect you against violent crime?” Collins asked.

“What we are trying to do here tonight is not to protect ourselves from violent crime. What we are trying to do here tonight is prevent students and teachers from feeling uncomfortable by you carrying a gun to protect yourself,” Harvey said.

“Every witness that has come up here tonight, they want to feel unintimidated and feel free to debate freely on a college campus. And having you have the right to defend yourself against a violent attacker weighs more for them than for you and the right to self-defense. And for that, I apologize,” he added.

Always handy with the facts, radio host Dana Loesch provides some data on firearms and self-defense:

According to the FBI, Americans use firearms in self defense 2.1 million times annually. Cases where firearms are used criminally amount to 579,000. Seventy percent of those cases are carried out by criminal repeat offenders. Barrett and Democrats would seek to punish those protecting themselves rather than the criminals.

There is a war on women, and it’s coming from the left to turn women into victims. Note this (bold my emphasis):

  • In the vast majority of those self-defense cases, the citizen will only brandish the gun or fire a warning shot.
  • In less than 8% of those self-defense cases will the citizen even wound his attacker.
  • Over 1.9 million of those self-defense cases involve handguns.
  • As many as 500,000 of those self-defense cases occur away from home.
  • Almost 10% of those self-defense cases are women defending themselves against sexual assault or abuse.

Further, Loesch notes that one in four collegiate women report experiences that fit the legal definition of rape and one in five woman are raped during their college years.

“See, Amanda Collins was overpowered, disarmed, and left to be a victim. By Nevada lawmakers. Not her rapist. Just what Hudak said would happen, though not exactly,” Loesch writes.

Democrats were apparently unconvinced by Collins’ testimony and the Judiciary Committee approved the campus concealed carry ban along with six other gun control proposals. All seven gun control bills are scheduled to be debated on the Colorado Senate floor on Friday. Some of the other bills included, “assault weapons liability” (making “assault weapons” manufacturers and retailers responsible for crimes), a high-capacity magazine ban, required background check fees, gun restrictions for domestic violence offenders and universal background checks.

Colorado is the same state where lawmakers have proposed using ballpoint pens, rape whistles and safe zones as an alternative to people defending themselves with a gun. Additionally, the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs advised women to urinate and vomit on an attacker.

 

This story has been updated