Maryland Woman Ticketed for Driving Two Mph Under the Speed Limit in 65 Zone, People Stand Up for Cops

(Photo: NBC Washington/News4)

A Maryland woman is outraged after receiving a ticket for driving just two miles per hour under the speed limit on Interstate 95, NBC Washington/News4 reports.

The woman, who prefers to remain anonymous, was driving to work Friday morning amid inclement weather when she decided to take her speed down to 63 mph from the limit of 65 mph.  StormTeam 4 Meteorologist Doug Kammerer confirmed that winds were gusting up to 40 mph.

“Sometimes when it’s dangerous, you have to do what you can to stay safe,” she explained.

But police apparently objected to the fact that she didn’t move into the right lane, slapping her with a ticket and a $90 fine.

“[I was] really shocked,” the Maryland woman remarked. “I thought, ‘Oh my God, you’ve got to be kidding me.’”

She plans to fight the ticket in court, and John Townsend of AAA Mid-Atlantic says the violation “[sends] the wrong message.”

“We will tolerate you driving at more than the speed limit,” he said, putting himself in the position of police, “but it you drive below the speed limit then you’re penalized for that.’”

News4 has more on the story:

But many are actually standing up for Maryland police, glad that they’re tackling one of the biggest driver grievances out there: slow drivers in the fast lane.

Jalopnik’s Travis Okulski writes:

There are a lot of little things that annoy me on the roads. One is a slow driver in the left lane on the highway. Seems like that annoys Maryland cops too, because they just ticketed a woman for doing 63 in the fast lane in a 65 zone. Good for them.

[...]

Of course, the AAA thinks the ticket is “silly” and “sends the wrong message.” It’s actually the opposite. The message it sends is 100 percent accurate. If you feel you need to slow down due to road conditions, feel free to do so. Just don’t do it in the left lane.

The driver is going to fight the ticket in court. I really hope it doesn’t get overturned. This sets a great precedent.

Kudos to you, Maryland State Police, for standing up for what we’ve all been saying for years.

What do you think?  Is the traffic violation absurd, or are you on the side of the Maryland police in this case?

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