While lawmakers debated a bill that would overhaul the way education is funded in Colorado and result in $1 billion in new taxes, state Sen. Evie Hudak (D-Westmister) suggested that they “finish it up real fast in two minutes” without thoroughly discussing a proposed amendment. She also told Sen. Owen Hill (R-Colorado Springs) to “flip a coin” when he asked how he could possibly vote on a major amendment he hadn’t read.

“I’m going to take a quick straw poll,” Hudak said. “How many want to finish it up real fast in two minutes, raise your hand.”

“How can I vote on it if we can’t have a little more discussion on it,” Hill replied.

“Take your best shot,” Hudak shot back.

When the roll was called, Hill again stated that he couldn’t vote on something that the legislature hadn’t read and discussed more thoroughly.

“Here’s a coin you can flip,” Hudak said.

“I didn’t knock on 20,000 doors to flip a coin,” Hill added.

“You’ll pass for now, here’s a coin if you want to flip it,” she said condescendingly.

“Unbelievable,” a stunned Hill muttered.

“The 2012 cycle is Senator Hudak’s last election, as she is term limited and will not have to stand for reelection. She is certainly acting like it,” Revealing Politics notes.

Listen to the audio via Revealing Politics below:

The Colorado Springs Gazette has more details on the school financing overhaul bill in question:

A complete overhaul of the way Colorado has funded schools for two decades would likely bring more money to all but one El Paso County school district.

But the complicated school finance reform hinges on voters approving an estimated $1 billion in additional taxes — an anticipated November ballot question that has not been introduced.

The extra money would be used to increase funding for early childhood education, special education, extended school days for at-risk schools, gifted and talented programs and teacher performance and evaluation.

Sen. Mike Johnston, D-Denver, said he authored the 174-page bill to ensure that students in Colorado have access to the resources they need regardless of who they are or where they live.

You may recall, Hudak is the same Colorado senator that told rape survivor Amanda Collins that a gun wouldn’t have helped her against her rapist because “statistics are not on your side.”

“You said that you were a martial arts student, I mean person, experienced in taekwondo, and yet because this individual was so large, was able to overcome you even with your skills, and chances are that if you had had a gun, then he would have been able to get that from you and possibly use it against you,” Hudak said.