A shocking statistic released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today revealed that about one in five teenage mothers has a second, third or fourth child before turning twenty.

The study determined that of the 365,000 teens who gave birth in 2010, about 67,000 have already had a child at some point.

More specifically, about 183 repeat teen births occur each day in the United States, they found.

CDC Statistic: 20% of Teen Births Arent With the First Child

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System, teens, ages 15–19, 2010. (Photo via the CDC)

The report adds:

Although teen birth rates have been falling for the last two decades, more than 365,000 teens, ages 15–19, gave birth in 2010. Teen pregnancy and childbearing can carry high health, emotional, social, and financial costs for both teen mothers and their children. Teen mothers want to do their best for their own health and that of their child, but some can become overwhelmed by life as a parent. Having more than one child as a teen can limit the teen mother’s ability to finish her education or get a job. Infants born from a repeat teen birth are often born too small or too soon, which can lead to more health problems for the baby.

The CDC offered a graphic of how the statistics break down by state:

CDC Statistic: 20% of Teen Births Arent With the First Child

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System, teens, ages 15–19, 2010. (Photo via the CDC)

But they also broke it down by ethnicity.

“American Indian and Alaskan Natives, Hispanics, and black teens are about 1.5 times more likely to have a repeat teen birth, compared to white teens,” the study said.

The report concludes with suggestions for preventing repeat teen pregnancies, from improved birth control to counseling on abstinence.

Leslie Kantor of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America used the statistic to emphasize the importance of her organization, and “Obamacare.”

“Overall, this data clearly speaks to the importance of the Affordable Care Act – which provides funding for teen pregnancy prevention programs and gives women coverage without co-pay for the full range of FDA-approved contraceptive methods,” she said.

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