Commander of the International Space Station Chris Hadfield has been answering questions about how astronauts perform every day tasks — like washing one’s hands — in space.

This latest one is not so much a how-to but a what does it look like. What does wringing out a washcloth in zero gravity look like? Answer: so much cooler than here on Earth.

First, you start off with a washcloth that has been packed down into what Hadfield calls a “hockey puck,” a design to help it save space on the confined space station.

Chris Hadfield Wrings Out a Washcloth in Space

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

Next, Hadfield uses a bag of water to soak the washcloth and wrings away.

Chris Hadfield Wrings Out a Washcloth in Space

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

Chris Hadfield Wrings Out a Washcloth in Space

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

Chris Hadfield Wrings Out a Washcloth in Space

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

Chris Hadfield Wrings Out a Washcloth in Space

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

“So the answer is the water squeezes out of the cloth. Then because of the surface tension of the water, it actually runs along the surface of the cloth and then up into my hand,” Hadfield explains. “Almost like you had Jell-O on your hands or gel on your hands, and it will just stay there.”

The screenshots are cool, but watching it is even better:

(H/T: io9)