Although the photos by Arthur Mole might look pixelated, it’s not due to poor resolution.

Mole, an English born photographer, created “living photographs.” Not not those of the Harry Potter variety, but those where an image portrayed in the photo is composed entirely of human beings.

io9 called attention to some of Mole and his partner John Thomas’ early twentieth century work recently. A similar feature a few years ago by Oddee reported that much of Mole and Thomas’ work was produced in World War I — sometimes composed of troops — and served as “rallying points to support American involvement in the war and to ward off isolationist tendencies.”

Here are some of the images from the Library of Congress:

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

“The Human U.S. Shield” composed of 30,000 officers and men at Camp Custer in Battle Creek, Mich. (Photo: Mole and Thomas/ Library of Congress)

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

“U.S. Naval Rifle Range” at Camp Logan in Illinois. (Photo: Mole and Tomas/Library of Congress)

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

“Sincerely yours, Woodrow Wilson” composed of 21,000 officers and men at Camp Sherman in Chillicothe, Ohio. (Photo: Mole and Thomas/Library of Congress)

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

Y.M.C.A. logo at Camp Wheeler in Georgia. (Photo: Mole and Thomas/Library of Congress)

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

The Liberty Bell composed of 25,000 officers and men at Camp Dix in New Jersey. (Photo: Mole and Thomas/Library of Congress)

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

“Machine Gun Insignia” made of 22,500 officers and men and 600 machine guns at Camp Hancock in Augusta, Ga. (Photo: Mole and Thomas/Library of Congress)

Arthur Mole Living Photography From World War I

Human Statue of Liberty composed of 18,000 officers and men at Camp Dodge in Des Moines, Iowa. (Photo: Mole and Thomas/Library of Congress)

Liked what you saw? Check out more of Mole and Thomas’ “living photographs” in the Library of Congress archive here.