We’re months past Christmas, but that hasn’t stopped Texas politicians from taking actions to protect the holiday from atheist activists’ attacks. From “secret snowflakes” to “holiday trees,” political correctness has created a scenario in which Americans are afraid to use specific language for fear of being targeted by non-theists.

But, alas, all that will soon change.

House Bill 308, which passed on Friday, will enable school teachers to say “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Hanukkah” starting during the 2013-2014 school year. The provision, also known as the “Merry Christmas Bill,” intends to do away with these fears.

Texas Politicians Take Legislative Action to Protect Christmas Against Atheist Activists    Here Are the Details

Photo Credit: MerryChristmasBill.com

But it doesn’t only give these public servants the green light to wish their students well during the holidays; it also lets them display Christmas trees, nativity scenes and menorahs — all elements that have been known to draw the ire of non-theist activists.

Of course, educators aren’t supposed to favor one faith. And any holiday display should have more than one religious view represented and should also showcase secular symbols, the Huffington Post reports.

See a version of the bill as it was originally introduced, belowTexas Politicians Take Legislative Action to Protect Christmas Against Atheist Activists    Here Are the Details

Having already passed the state Senate and now the House, the bill is likely to be signed by Republican Gov. Rick Perry. For those who may be scratching their heads over why a law pertaining the the holidays has been touted and taken up in the Texas legislature, consider the ongoing War on Christmas — the multitude of stories that emerge each year in communities across the nation.

A website setup to advertise the provision reads:

Kids love the holidays. Whether it’s Christmas or Hanukkah, our children, teachers, parents and school administrators should have the freedom to acknowledge these traditions in our public schools without fear of censorship, punishment, persecution or litigation.

In today’s world of political correctness run amok, Christmas Trees have been replaced with “Holiday Trees” and simple on-campus greetings such as “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Hanukkah” can land a student or teacher in hot water.

In Texas, it seems politicians are tired of fighting this battle, so the law is intended to create a more robust and free environment for teachers who wish to celebrate the holidays. The leaders who sponsored the bill, state Rep. Dwayne Bohac and state Sen. Robert Nichols, both Republicans, did so in an effort to protect teachers from attacks over sectarian holiday mentions.

(H/T: Huffington Post)