The National Security Agency has a powerful worldwide data-mining tool called “Boundless Informant” that “details and even maps by country the voluminous amount of information it collects from computer and telephone networks,” The Guardian reports.

Boundless Informant Is the NSAs Worldwide Surveillance Tool, the Guardian Reports

(Credit: The Guardian)

The UK publication said today it possesses “top-secret documents” about Boundless Informant which show the NSA can record and analyze “where its intelligence comes from, raising questions about its repeated assurances to Congress that it cannot keep track of all the surveillance it performs on American communications.”

More from The Guardian:

The focus of the internal NSA tool is on counting and categorizing the records of communications, known as metadata, rather than the content of an email or instant message.

The Boundless Informant documents show the agency collecting almost 3 billion pieces of intelligence from US computer networks over a 30-day period ending in March 2013. One document says it is designed to give NSA officials answers to questions like, “What type of coverage do we have on country X” in “near real-time by asking the SIGINT [signals intelligence] infrastructure.”

An NSA factsheet about the program, acquired by the Guardian, says: “The tool allows users to select a country on a map and view the metadata volume and select details about the collections against that country.”

Under the heading “Sample use cases”, the factsheet also states the tool shows information including: “How many records (and what type) are collected against a particular country.”

The Guardian also reports that it’s seen a “top secret NSA “global heat map” from a snapshot of the Boundless Informant data; it shows that in March 2013 the agency “collected 97bn pieces of intelligence from computer networks worldwide.”

The nation receiving the most scrutiny? Iran, with “more than 14bn reports in that period, followed by 13.5bn from Pakistan.” Third in the list was Jordan, “with 12.7bn, Egypt fourth with 7.6bn and India fifth with 6.3bn.”

Boundless Informant Is the NSAs Worldwide Surveillance Tool, the Guardian Reports

(Credit: The Guardian) 

The Guardian report continues:

The heatmap gives each nation a color code based on how extensively it is subjected to NSA surveillance. The color scheme ranges from green (least subjected to surveillance) through yellow and orange to red (most surveillance).

The disclosure of the internal Boundless Informant system comes amid a struggle between the NSA and its overseers in the Senate over whether it can track the intelligence it collects on American communications. The NSA’s position is that it is not technologically feasible to do so.

At a hearing of the Senate intelligence committee In March this year, Democratic senator Ron Wyden asked James Clapper, the director of national intelligence: “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?”

“No sir,” replied Clapper.

Judith Emmel, an NSA spokeswoman, told the Guardian in a response to the latest disclosures: “NSA has consistently reported – including to Congress – that we do not have the ability to determine with certainty the identity or location of all communicants within a given communication. That remains the case.”

Other documents seen by the Guardian further demonstrate that the NSA does in fact break down its surveillance intercepts which could allow the agency to determine how many of them are from the US. The level of detail includes individual IP addresses.

IP address is not a perfect proxy for someone’s physical location but it is rather close, said Chris Soghoian, the principal technologist with the Speech Privacy and Technology Project of the American Civil Liberties Union. “If you don’t take steps to hide it, the IP address provided by your internet provider will certainly tell you what country, state and, typically, city you are in,” Soghoian said.

Read the entire report at The Guardian.

(H/T: The Guardian)