The American people have spoken: The dining room table is no place for Old Glory.

The Home & Garden Television network has issued an apology for suggesting that American flags could be used as tablecloths for their Fourth of July shindigs.

The article in question, Yahoo News notes, suggested viewers “drape a large American flag over the table as a bright and festive table runner.” It was titled “Classic Fourth of July Table Setting Ideas.”

It also suggested using a “nylon flag so spills can be easily wiped off and the flag can later be hung with pride on a flag pole.”

HGTV Apologizes for Suggesting the American Flag Can Be Used as a Tablecloth for July 4 Parties

(Credit: HGTV)

HGTV issued this apology on its Facebook page:

HGTV Apologizes for Suggesting the American Flag Can Be Used as a Tablecloth for July 4 Parties

(Credit: Facebook) 

Yahoo also noted how many were expressing their anger:

Many viewers expressed outrage. “Using an American flag as a table cloth dishonors all Americans who love Old Glory—especially those who gave their lives defending it,” one viewer wrote on HGTV’s Facebook page before the segment was pulled.

“I cannot fathom why y’all would suggest something so disrespectful,” wrote another. “I am appalled that you would suggest using the flag that my brother was killed defending in Iraq as something to catch spills on a table at a cookout. I am positively appalled.”

“No one dies for a table cloth,” another added.

The Flag Code, says WPXL-TV, formalizes and unifies the traditional ways in which we give respect to the flag and contains specific instructions on how the flag is not to be used.

They are:

  • The flag should never be dipped to any person or thing. It is flown upside down only as a distress signal.
  • The flag should not be used as a drapery, or for covering a speakers desk, draping a platform, or for any decoration in general. Bunting of blue, white and red stripes is available for these purposes. The blue stripe of the bunting should be on the top.
  • The flag should never be used for any advertising purpose. It should not be embroidered, printed or otherwise impressed on such articles as cushions, handkerchiefs, napkins, boxes, or anything intended to be discarded after temporary use. Advertising signs should not be attached to the staff or halyard.
  • The flag should not be used as part of a costume or athletic uniform, except that a flag patch may be used on the uniform of military personnel, fireman, policeman and members of patriotic organizations.
  • The flag should never have placed on it, or attached to it, any mark, insignia, letter, word, number, figure, or drawing of any kind.
  • The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.