Glenn Beck was in the middle of his weekday radio program Wednesday when the Supreme Court’s rulings on the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8 came in.

He said he’ll need some time to read the text to make a firm opinion, but based on what he’s seen, Beck took what some outsiders might think is an unexpected position, mainly that “this can be a very good day for everybody” if the issues are viewed in their complete context.

Regarding the Defense of Marriage Act, Beck and his co-hosts Pat Gray and Stu Burguiere all agreed that it’s a “no-brainer” that straight and homosexual couples should receive the same benefits — the problem so far has been government overreach concerning “who gets money and who [doesn't].”

“Government should not be involved in marriage at all…” Beck said.  “There’s no reason for it.  I don’t get the value of my marriage from the government, I get it from God.  And if someone else gets it from Randy down the street, whatever.  I want the government out of my my bedroom, my garage, my kitchen, my living room, my office, my backyard, my school, I want the government out of my life.”

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Beck added: “The other thing is: I want the government out of my church.  My church has a right to practice religion the way we see and understand God.  I have a right of conscience.  If you want to go find a church that marries a gay couple that is totally fine…[but] my church does not do that, and it will fundamentally change what I believe is the eternal family…and I have a right to believe that, as long as I’m not trying to force you to do anything.”

But just because he and the courts appear to agree on the outcome — that the government treats gay and straight couples equally — Beck said he doesn’t believe limited government was the motivating factor for the court.

On the contrary, he explained: “On Proposition 8, the people have a right to pass laws — to create a bill and pass it…[But] what happened is the Supreme Court said the people can pass whatever they want, but if the state doesn’t listen to the people…then they have no jurisdiction to bring it to the Supreme Court.  So that means the courts and your representatives have complete power.”

Proposition 8 was the anti-gay marriage law passed in California in 2008 that the state decided not to defend in court challenges. The Supreme Court ruled that anyone else suing on behalf of the law didn’t have the proper ability, or “standing,”  to do so.

“We are no longer of, by, and for the people,” he concluded.  “It is a total disconnect of the people…You are no longer in charge.”

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