Adly Mansour, chairman of the Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt only since July 1, has been named the new leader of Egypt.

Heres What We Know about Egypts Interim President, Adly Mansour

(Credit: Twitter via HuffPo)

The 68-year-old judge was called to the position of acting President of Egypt by the military, according to Business Insider, following the takeover of the government and removal of previous President Mohammed Morsi.

Mansour will act as president until a new constitution is drawn up and new elections are held, according to CNN.

Here’s are five other things we’re hearing about Mansour:

1. Here’s his photo, via Al Arabiya Channel’s Twitter account:

Heres What We Know about Egypts Interim President, Adly Mansour

(Credit: Twitter via Buzzfeed)

2. Mansour was appointed to the head of the constitutional court on June 11 by former President Morsi, according to the African Business Journal.

3. He’ll be sworn in on Thursday, July 4:

Heres What We Know about Egypts Interim President, Adly Mansour

(Credit: Twitter via Muckrack.com)

4. There’s a grand effort afoot to update Mansour’s Wikipedia page, which was created only hours ago:

Heres What We Know about Egypts Interim President, Adly Mansour

(Credit: Twitter via Muckrack.com)

Heres What We Know about Egypts Interim President, Adly Mansour

(Credit: Twitter via Muckrack.com)

5. He’s a Cairo University Law School grad and began as a judge on the Supreme Constitutional Court in 1992, according to his updated Wikipedia page:

Heres What We Know about Egypts Interim President, Adly Mansour

(Credit: Wikipedia)

More from The Independent:

Born in 1945, Mansour was appointed to the court in 1992, making him one of its longest-serving judges. The Muslim Brotherhood and the court repeatedly clashed during Mohamed Morsi’s clumsy attempts to force through constitutional change, with the Islamist party seeing it as an enemy and launching sometimes violent protests against its members.

Despite his control over Egypt’s political institutions Morsi was never able to control the judiciary, many of whom were Mubarak-era appointees. In December last year security guards had to step in after the car of Maher al-Beheiry, Mansour’s predecessor, was attacked by Brotherhood supporters fearful the court would dissolve the Islamist-dominated Constituent Assembly tasked with drafting the amended constitution.

This is a breaking news story. Updates will be added.