Pastor Ken Hutcherson’s story both inspires and captivates audiences. The faith leader, who recently participated in Glenn Beck’s “Man in the Moon,” has battled terminal cancer for years — and has had a fascinating journey when it comes to his views on race relations in America. Considering this latter element of his story, Hutcherson is speaking out in the wake of the George Zimmerman verdict.

After opening a recent op-ed with a Martin Luther King Jr. quote about speaking the truth, he warned readers that what he was about to say wouldn’t be popular, polite or safe — but that it is, in his view, “right.” From there, he dove right in to the tragic Trayvon Martin saga.

“When you have a young black boy who is killed by what some are calling a white Hispanic, and Jackson and Sharpton (of the PPA or the Poverty Pimps of America), and a liberal media involved, you have the equivalent of nitroglycerin,” Hutcherson wrote. “Oh by the way, I never heard of ‘white Hispanic’ before but I guess this fits the bill in this case. This incident only needed someone to light the fuse. Why is this true because black people are involved?”

Pastor Ken Hutcherson Speaks Out to Fellow African Americans Amid Taryvon Martin Furor: Put Jesus Above Our Blackness

Pastor Ken Hutcherson (Photo Credit: TheBlaze/Billy Hallowell)

The preacher went on to state his agreement with some of Dr. James Manning’s sentiments surrounding George Zimmerman and the Martin case. As you may recall, Manning delivered a controversial message proclaiming that African Americans are viewing the world — and the Martin case — through their “black eyes” and that they need to start looking, instead, through the “blood of Jesus.”

Hutcherson continued:

I believe Dr. James Manning hit it on the head when he said that black people have a difficult time accepting truth simply because they are black. That’s right, black people are involved and it is impossible for the average black person to believe the truth. They refuse to believe that a black boy could be in the wrong when it comes to a white Hispanic. Blackness is the apex of victimhood and our blackness is above truth, above our Christianity, above our God, above our Holy Spirit, so that means if our blackness is above the Holy Spirit, then it is above Truth. This is so important for everyone to know this so they can understand why this Trayvon and Zimmerman case is where it is today and why blacks refuse to believe what really happened.

The preacher, who also highlighted the actual events that he believes might have taken place between Zimmerman and Martin, went on to say that African Americans need to “put Jesus above our blackness” if they want to be the “great people” that they truly are. Hutcherson also implored African Americans to take action, to help promote change and to alter the conversation about racism in America.

Read the pastor’s article here. In addition to Hutcherson and Manning, the Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson also recently took a similar view, making controversial comments during a heated exchange with CNN’s Piers Morgan last week.

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