Mexican paleontologists say they have uncovered 50 vertebrae believed to be a full dinosaur tail in the northern desert of Coahuila state.

The National Institute of Anthropology and History says the tail is about 15 feet long and resembles that of a hadrosaur or crested duckbill dinosaur.

Mexico Dinosaur Tail

In this undated image released by Mexico’s National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH) on Monday, July 22, 2013, the tail of a dinosaur is uncovered at a paleontological dig site near the town of General Cepeda in northern Mexico. Paleontologists say they have uncovered 50 vertebrae of Mexico’s first complete dinosaur tail of what they believe may be the remains of a Hadrosaur or crested duckbill dinosaur. (Photo: AP/INAH-Mauricio Marat)

An institute Monday says it’s not yet possible to confirm the species, but it would be the first full tail of that kind in Mexico.

Paleontologist Felisa Aguilar says they uncovered roughly half of the dinosaur, which was 36 feet (12 meters) long and is dated to have lived 72 million years ago.

Reuters reported the find of a full tail being rare in the field.

The excavation took 20 days in the municipality of General Cepeda in the northern state that borders Texas.

The paleontologists, working with Mexico’s National Autonomous University, also found hip bones.

This video shows paleontologists uncovering some of the tail:

In other dinosaur-related news, last week researchers in Utah they discovered a new type of big-nosed, horned-faced dinosaur that lived about 76 million years ago in the area of what is now the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

Dinosaur Discovery Utah

Dinosaur paleontologist Scott Sampson,makes remarks as he stands next to a reconstruction of a “Nasutoceratops titusi” during a news conference at the Natural History Museum of Utah Wednesday, July 17, 2013, in Salt lake City. The dinosaur was a wide-bodied plant-eater that grew to 15 feet long and weighed 2 1/2 tons. It’s unique for its oversized nose and exceptionally long, forward-pointing curved horns over the eyes. It’s part of the same family as the well-known Triceratops. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

The discovery of the creature, named “Nasutoceratops titusi,” was described in the British scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B and by officials at the National History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City.

The dinosaur was a wide-bodied plant-eater that grew to 15 feet long and weighed 2 1/2 tons, said Patti Carpenter, spokeswoman for the museum. It is considered unique for its oversized nose and its exceptionally long, curved and forward-pointing horns over the eyes. It also had a low, narrow blade-like horn above the nose.

Research headed by Scott Sampson, former chief curator at the museum, determined that Nasutoceratops lived in a swampy and subtropical environment about 62 miles from the water.

Dinosaur Discovery Utah

This illustration from provided by the Natural History Museum of Utah shows a “Nasutoceratops titusi”. (Photo: AP/Natural History Museum of Utah, Andrey Atuchin)

It was part of the same family as the well-known Triceratops, from which it derives part of its name. The second part of the name recognizes paleontologist Alan Titus for his years of research work in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.