MARION, Ill. (TheBlaze/AP) — In protest of a court ruling, a southern Illinois businessman has paid off part of a court-ordered legal settlement with nearly four tons of quarters packed into dozens of bags. In total, the coins were worth $150,000.

And he isn’t sorry. In fact, he said he wishes he could’ve made the payment in pennies.

Illinois Man Repays $500,000 in Insurance Money With 4 Tons of Quarters

In this Wednesday, July 31, 2013 photo, workers unload bags full of quarters from a Brinks Security truck to a trailer in Marion, Ill. The coins were being delivered to two local law firms by Roger Herrin, of Harrisburg, Ill., who was paying off a portion of a court-ordered legal settlement with nearly four tons of quarters packed into dozens of bags. The settlement was related to a 2001 car accident in which his teenage son died. Credit: AP

Illinois Man Repays $500,000 in Insurance Money With 4 Tons of Quarters

In this Wednesday, July 31, 2013 photo, bags of quarters are shown in Marion, Ill., before delivery to two local law firms on behalf of Roger Herrin, of Harrisburg, Ill., who was paying off a portion of a court-ordered legal settlement with nearly four tons of quarters packed into dozens of bags. Credit: AP

Roger Herrin, of Harrisburg, was ordered by an appellate court to repay $500,000 in insurance money related to a 2001 car accident in which his teenage son died.

The reimbursement followed years of legal disputes about how the insurance money was apportioned to the crash victims.

Because his son was the only one of the four passengers in the car who died, Herrin received most of the $800,000 settlement from the car’s insurance. He was also reportedly awarded $1.65 million in other insurance payments due to his son’s death.

“They can have all the money in the world, and I’d take my son back,” Herrin told WSIL. “To support, my deceased son and ex-wife, I have to fight it to the very end, and this is the final end.”

So as one final act of defiance, Herrin repaid nearly a third of the money – $150,000 – with 50-pound bags of quarters he had trucked in by the Federal Reserve bank in St. Louis. The coins were delivered Wednesday to a Marion law firm.

The attorneys representing the other families were not amused. Herrin, on the other hand, showed no remorse.

“I really wanted to do it in pennies,” he told NBC News.