Democratic California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new law into effect on Monday afternoon affording students confused about their “gender identity” a host of new rights, including the ability to use either a boy’s or girl’s restroom and either locker room.

The legislation, Assembly Bill 1266, authored by Democratic State Assemblyman Tom Ammiano from San Francisco, allows students in grades as young as kindergarten to use “facilities consistent with his or her gender identity, irrespective of the gender listed on the pupil’s records.”

Ammiano’s spokesman, Carlos Alcala, told TheBlaze on Monday afternoon the bill would even permit high school males who say they identify as females, to use a woman’s locker room.

“If that’s his deep gender identity, yes,” Alcala said.

Gov. Jerry Brown

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 1266 into law on Monday allowing students confused about their “gender identity” to use either the boy’s or girl’s restroom. (AP)

Speaking to parents and students who may be unhappy with the new law, Alcala said Ammiano would tell them that “being uncomfortable does not justify discrimination.”

Alcala, however, added that if “somebody is a boy or has appeared as a boy for six months of school comes to school one day and says I’m a girl and need to use the girl locker room… I think school officials would have a hard time saying that’s fine.”

He admitted that under the new law there is no method in which a school official can actually deny such a student the ability to use whichever facility he or she says they identify with.

“There is nothing in the bill to spell out what the process is,” Alcala said.

Randy Thomasson, of the socially conservative advocacy group SaveCalifornia.com, called the law “insanity.”

“This radical bill warps the gender expectations of children by forcing all California public schools to permit biological boys in girls restrooms, showers, clubs and on girls sports teams and biological girls in boys restrooms, showers, clubs and sports teams,” he told Fox News.

The bill only applies to grades K-12 and does not apply to private schools, according to Alcala.

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