Since the U.S. has started serious discussions about taking military action against Syria, many have publicly spoken out against a possible military strike. And now it appears that some of our uniformed service personnel have come forward to express their disagreement with an attack, any attack on Syria.

More than 2,000 people have “liked” this image that was posted on Sunday.

Photo posted by member of the US Army

Image: Armed Forces Tea Party on Facebook

There were also photos posted from people wearing the uniforms of the Marines, Navy and Air Force. These have also received Facebook “likes” in the thousands.

US Marine on Syria

Image: Armed Forces Tea Party on Facebook

US Navy personnel on Syria

Image: Armed Forces Tea Party on Facebook

Military montage on Syria

Image: Armed Forces Tea Party on Facebook

Is this kind of behavior allowed? Well, there are rules concerning what uniformed military personnel can and cannot do, especially when it comes to making a political statement. In reviewing the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), Article 88 could come into play here. That section states:

Any commissioned officer who uses contemptuous words against the President, the Vice President, Congress, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of a military department, the Secretary of Transportation, or the Governor or legislature of any State, Territory, Commonwealth, or possession in which he is on duty or present shall be punished as a court-martial may direct.

We see that commissioned officers could be called to question if they posted a photo like those seen above. What about enlisted or non-commissioned personnel? The UCMJ has rules for these folks as well. According to Article 92, failure to obey an order could result in being court-martialed.

Any person subject to this chapter who–

(1) violates or fails to obey any lawful general order or regulation;

(2) having knowledge of any other lawful order issued by any member of the armed forces, which it is his duty to obey, fails to obey the order; or

(3) is derelict in the performance of his duties;

shall be punished as a court-martial may direct.

Where do you stand on this issue? Should members of the military be allowed to publicly post their disagreement with a possible strike on Syria while they are in uniform? Take part in our Blaze Poll and feel free to comment below.

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