What do those plastic pink flamingo lawn ornaments and Disney costumes have in common? Both have been inspired by National Geographic photos.

For 125 years now, the photojournalism coming out of the magazine has given National Geographic a reputation.

Robert Draper with NatGeo captures the stigma that comes with working for the iconic magazine:

When I tell people that I work for this magazine, I see their eyes grow wide, and I know what will happen when I add, as I must: “Sorry, I’m just one of the writers.” A National Geographic photographer is the personification of worldliness, the witness to all earthly beauty, the occupant of everybody’s dream job. I’ve seen The Bridges of Madison County—I get it, I’m not bitter.

It’s true: when people think NatGeo, they picture the award-winning photos.

In 1888 for its first issue, National Geographic magazine was sent to 165 people. Now, the publication known for its beautiful images makes its way to the eyes of 60 million people.

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The cover of National Geographic’s October issue devoted to its 125 years of photography. (Image: National Geographic)

To celebrate its more than a century, NatGeo devoted its entire October issue to highlight its photographic excellence.

“Photography is a powerful tool and form of self-expression,” Chris Johns, editor in chief of National Geographic magazine said in a statement. “Sharing what you see and experience through the camera allows you to connect, move and inspire people around the world.”

Here is just a small fraction of the images that have brought NatGeo to the photographic status it has today:

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Afghanistan 2010 (Photo: Lynsey Addario/National Geographic)

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China 2011 (Photo: Ralf Dumovitz/National Geographic)

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Yemen (Photo: National Geographic)

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Jane Goodall with Jou Jou in 1990 in the Republic of Congo. (Photo: Michael Nichols/National Geographic)

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Emperor Penguins (Photo: National Geographic)

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A child in a photo titled “Vanishing Languages”. (Photo: National Geographic)

In addition to its October issue, NatGeo also launched a new photo blog last week called Proof, which ”will take a provocative and eclectic look at the world of National Geographic photography and the field overall,” NatGeo’s announcement stated.