There are rants, and then there’s Barry Hinson’s tirade after his team lost Tuesday night. The word “epic” gets thrown around a lot these days, but Hinson’s monologue after his Southern Illinois team lost to Murray State is truly epic. And it included accusations of “mamma’s boys” as well as using his wife to shame players.

We won’t dilute it by typing a bunch of stuff before the video. Just watch:

So here’s part of what he said, courtesy of HuffPost:

“Marcus [Fillyaw] was absolutely awful. That’s about as PG rated as I can say it. He was awful. Our guards were awful. Our three starting guards had one assist and seven turnovers. They must think it’s a tax credit!” he said. “It’s unbelievable how our starting guards played. And lets talk about our big guys. Two for 11. How can you go two for 11? My wife! My wife can score more than two buckets on 11 shots because I know my wife will at least shot fake one time.”

More from ESPN:

“I’ve got a bunch of mama’s boys right now,” Hinson told reporters at his postgame news conference. “We just won’t buck up and bow our necks. We’ve got to get through that. I’m tired of coaching a guy and having him roll his eyes or put his head down or feel sorry for himself. This is big time. People lose their jobs.”

So does Hinson regret any of it? Only one part.

“I regret one thing — calling out Marcus’ name,” He told ESPN. “That wasn’t fair to him individually, and I’m upset about that. But I’m not upset about anything else I said.

“I’m not going to fake who I am. I’m an emotional guy and I love my players, but I was frustrated with their overall lack of effort. I felt bad about mentioning one of my player’s names. That was a mistake.”

And the school is standing by him. Southern Illinois’ athletic director, Mario Moccia, told ESPN the rant was because Hinson cares.

“Barry cares about his players,” he said. “I know this is not the season he wanted to have after 10 games [2-8]. The losses have mounted, and he’s frustrated. I just wish he didn’t call out the players specifically and would have used more generalities.”