An alleged recent note from a teacher to parents about how kindergarteners should handle Valentine’s Day greetings has some calling its contents evidence of political correctness at its worst.

In the brief letter, children are encouraged to bring in cards for their peers on Feb. 14, but with an important caveat: they must provide a greeting for each child in the class.

“If your child chooses to exchange Valentine cards in school he or she should have one for each classmate,” reads the note, posted by Twitter user kristinf416. “This will avoid hurt feelings.”

The brief letter also asks parents not to put any names on the outside of the greetings’ envelopes, as it “will make it easier for the children to pass out the cards themselves.”

Here’s the letter:

Image source: Twitter user Kristinf416

Image source: Twitter user Kristinf416

Some critics are calling the mandate that children offer each classmate a card in order to “avoid hurt feelings” too politically correct. Guyism editor Chris Spags was among those commenting on the matter.

“Tolerance is a great thing. Political correctness, however, is often a big bag of suck,” he wrote. “This note that went out to parents at one New Jersey school about Valentine’s Day is proof of how bad it’s gotten.”

He continued, “Call me crazy but aren’t hurt feelings a good thing sometimes? Rejection helps you learn and grow stronger, regardless of the age. Life isn’t all sunshine and bubble wrap.”

Opie from the “Opie and Anthony” radio show tweeted that the letter is “pathetic everyone gets a trophy BS.”

[blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/OpieRadio/status/433010129991385088"]

Not everyone disagreed with the teacher’s sentiment though:

[blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/ethud01/status/433025695309389824"]

What do you think? Let us know below.

(H/T: Guyism)

Featured image via Twitter user Kristinf416

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