Like with many children, young Jake Lockett loved to draw. He kept up with this passion as he got older, but that’s not all he kept.

He has maintained a good collection of his artwork from age 2 through 24, showing the progression of his talent.

Age 2 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 2 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

“I have had a huge interest in drawing as far back as I can remember,” Lockett told TheBlaze in an email. “My older sister used to draw a lot, and I feel that her work inspired me and gave me a standard to strive for at a young age. I have fond memories of drawing with her as a child.”

Age 3 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 3 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Outside of the usual art classes one would take in primary and secondary school, Lockett said he didn’t take courses. He does, however, credit his time at the University of Lincoln in England, where he graduated with first class honors, as giving him the time to hone his skill.

“One of the best things about being at university was that it gave me the time to draw surrounded by other people who draw, which is probably far more helpful than any sit-down lesson on art history or techniques,” he said. 

If you take a close look at the content of his work, you’ll see timely cultural references.

“I was clearly keen on ‘Jurassic Park’ when I was 4 and ‘Jurassic Park II: The Lost World’ when I was 8. You can also see when I was into ‘Star Wars,’ and my interest in Warhammer models also becomes apparent at age 10, but dies out quite quickly,” he said.

Age 4 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 4 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 8 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 8 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 10 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 10 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

As he grew up, Lockett said science fiction a main inspiration.

Age 12 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 12 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 15 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 15 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Though he thinks in the last two decades of his life that his styles fluctuated as he grew, he said he found his feet in his teens and early 20s, making them a more interesting time for him to look back upon and analyze.

“I still enjoy experimenting with my work, but I feel my work now has an artistic signature that is easily recognizable,” Lockett said.

Age 16 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 16 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 18 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 18 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 23 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

Age 23 (Image source: Jake Lockett)

The reason he put his progression of work out there was to show that not all artists are born talented.

“People often seem to feel that artists have an inherent talent, but in this project I intended to show that with work, progression is inevitable, a concept that will hopefully inspire others to peruse their interests wholeheartedly,” Lockett said. “I like to think of it as a ‘The Chicken and the Egg’ scenario. Do I draw a lot because I am good, or am I good because I draw a lot? I don’t know, probably a bit of both.”

Lockett doesn’t work professionally as an illustrator, but he is in an artistic field. He works for the U.K.-based design agency Eat With Your Eyes. On the side, he illustrates for those who commission his work.

And he still hasn’t given up on drawing for his own enjoyment.

“I love learning new techniques and find the act of drawing too therapeutic to quit,” he said.

Check out more from Lockett’s years of work on his “Drawing Progression” gallery. See more of his other artistic endeavors on his website.

(H/T: Gizmodo)