When Ginger Anderson, a Utah Valley University employee and student, made a small change to an incorrect wall map inside of one the school’s buildings, she had no idea it would result in her being manhandled and arrested by police officers.

The 48-year-old, who works in the information center at the university, says she marked on the map with a marker because students were having trouble getting to classes. In fact, it was literally depicted upside down. She claims she corrected the map’s compass, and wrote in marker that the map was upside down.

That was in January.

Two days later, two officers with the UVU police department confronted Anderson and informed her that she would be issued a citation for “criminal mischief.” What happened next was caught on one of the officer’s lapel cameras.

KUTV

KUTV

When Anderson refused to immediately comply with the officers’ demands to come to the police station, one of the cops grabbed her, pushed her against the wall and took her to the ground.

Police say Anderson resisted while the UVU student and employee claims the officers used excessive force. Anderson also claims officers tried to handcuff her hands behind her back while she was wearing a large backpack, making that task difficult.

“Let me take my backpack off!” the woman can be heard shouting in the video.

An independent review found that Anderson did indeed resist — both passively and actively — and therefore officers did not break any laws or act inappropriately, KUTV reports.

Anderson says she’s more shocked that the police department decided to take such extreme action over a marking on a map that was intended to help students.

Watch the uncut video of the arrest below:

The arrest has sparked a contentious debate in KUTV’s comments section, some siding with Anderson and others siding with the officers.

“This woman is what is wrong with people today,” one user wrote. “She feels so entitled that she is above the Law!”

“Bending a 48 year old women’s arm with her backpack on is an absolute assault. she was wiling to cooperate yet these officers clearly shown brutality,” another user argued.

Others had no problem with officers issuing Anderson a citation, but wondered why a simple citation required her to come to the police station or face arrest.

“If they were sent there to give her a citation, why didn’t they bring it with them? There was no need for her to go to the police station to receive her citation,” a user commented.

“I’m not sure I want my children going to a school where they make such a big thing out of nothing,” another wrote.