The “real reason” the White House has yet to release photos of Osama bin Laden’s corpse is because U.S. troops “took turns dumping magazines-worth of ammunition” into the terror leader’s body, according to a new SOFREP report. Citing unnamed sources within the special ops community, the report alleges bin Laden “had over a hundred bullets in him, by the most conservative estimate.”

Osama bin Laden

This undated file photo shows al Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan. (Photo: AP)

According to the account of the SEAL Team Six member behind the book “No Easy Day,” the terrorist was shot with “several rounds.” SOFREP’s sources are now disputing that claim:

But this is perhaps the most measured and polite description that one could give of how operator after operator took turns dumping magazines-worth of ammunition into Bin Laden’s body, two confidential sources within the community have told us. When all was said and done, UBL had over a hundred bullets in him, by the most conservative estimate.

SOFREP’s Jack Murphy, an 8-year Army Special Operations veteran, goes on to question the legality of the “pure self-indulgence” such a display would represent.

“You may not care if Bin Laden got some extra holes punched in him, few of us do, but what should concern you is a trend within certain special operations units to engage in this type of self-indulgent, and ultimately criminal, behavior,” he writes. “Gone unchecked, these actions get worse over time.”

Though the claim is far from the undisputed truth at this point, the excessive gun shots would explain why President Barack Obama’s administration was adamant about preventing the photos from being released.

Judicial Watch lost a lawsuit over access to the photos last year.

“Now you know the real reason why the Obama administration has not released pictures of Osama Bin Laden’s corpse,” Murphy concludes. “To do so would show the world a body filled with a ridiculous number of gunshot wounds.”

Read the entire SOFREP report here.

(H/T: HuffPost)

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