Kathy Rowe wanted a house in the Carmel Valley area north of San Diego.

Badly.

So intense was her disappointment when a husband and wife outbid her for the house that prosecutors said she embarked on a gigantic plot to take revenge on them — and Rowe’s actions could land her in jail.

Image source: KNSD-TV

Image source: KNSD-TV

According to the felony complaint, Rowe impersonated the wife and posted a sexually-explicit, online advertisement for the “Carmel Valley Freak Show,” according to KNSD-TV in San Diego.

The graphic ad instructed readers to contact the woman for sexual activity while her husband wasn’t at home.

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The language Rowe used, as detailed in the complaint, was crude and very specific about the types of sex acts the woman would engage in with male visitors.

Two men actually responded to the bogus ad. Rowe, again impersonating the new owner of the Carmel Valley home, told them to go the woman’s home and gave them the address.

In Rowe’s communiques with one man, she wrote “I also love to be surprised and have a man just show up at the door and force his way in the door and on me, totally taking me while I say no.”

“Just stop by anytime Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,” Rowe instructed both men. “I like the element of surprise.”

And here’s where it gets really scary: One of the men actually showed up at the home — twice, KNSD noted.

Which is why prosecutors insisted that Rowe crossed the line and charged her with soliciting forcible rape and forcible sodomy, as well as other offenses.

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However, a Superior Court judge dismissed the most serious of those charges before trial, saying that he didn’t have a strong suspicion that Rowe “had the specific intent to cause the two men to commit any kind of sexual assault” on the woman who bought that house.

The district attorney’s office disagreed, and appealed the judge’s ruling.

And in a recent opinion, the Fourth District Court of Appeal, in a split decision, reinstated those criminal charges.

The justices noted that the evidence in this case “… creates a reasonable inference Rowe intended the men to take indecent liberties with, lay hold of, or kiss the victim against her will when they made contact with the victim.”

As you might have guessed, Rowe didn’t stop with the X-rated ad — and cooked up a bunch of relatively benign pranks for extra effect.

Prosecutors said she had more than $1,000 in unsolicited magazines and books delivered to the couple’s house, posted an online announcement for a high school New Year’s Eve party there, and advertised a free Mexican fireworks giveaway at Rowe’s former dream house on July 4.

And there’s more!

Rowe also listed the victim’s house for sale, had Valentine’s Day cards from the husband delivered to other women in the neighborhood, and even had religious groups pay them visits.

Rowe’s lawyer said her actions were nothing more than “prankish behavior” and deeply regrets them.

Of note: Court documents state that when officers questioned Rowe, she initially denied committing all of the acts, then later allegedly ‘fessed up and denied she was attempting to harm the couple.

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