“The ship is sinking.”

That was the message one unidentified student posted to social media on April 16, as the South Korea ferry he was a passenger on began going down.

The student also took photos of the awful scene inside the vessel, according to NBC News, which show many fellow passengers trapped — and he posted the photos along with his written message.

Image source: NBC News/

Image source: NBC News/GlobalNews/FactTV

His body is still missing along with the bodies of 114 others.

Image source: NBC News/GlobalNews/FactTV

Image source: NBC News/GlobalNews/FactTV

A majority of the missing and 187 confirmed dead are 16- and 17-year-old students from one high school.

Image source: NBC News/GlobalNews/FactTV

Image source: NBC News/GlobalNews/FactTV

In the meantime, South Korea’s prime minister offered to resign Sunday over the government’s handling of the ferry sinking, blaming “deep-rooted evils” and societal irregularities for the tragedy that has led to widespread shame, fury and finger-pointing.

The resignation offer comes amid rising indignation over claims by the victims’ relatives that the government didn’t do enough to rescue or to protect their loved ones. Officials have taken into custody all 15 people involved in navigating the ferry, a prosecutor said.

More from NBC News:

While diving teams spot victims — including 48 in one room — they cannot gain access to recover the bodies. Approaching heavy rains and fierce winds threaten to halt search efforts until Monday.

The high tides and strong currents already forced crews to call off the search Saturday, following the conclusion of a full day without the recovery of a single victim.

The Sewol was carrying an estimated 3,608 tons of cargo, according to an executive of the company that loaded it. That far exceeds what the captain claimed in paperwork — 150 cars and 657 tons of other cargo, according to the coast guard — and is more than three times what an inspector who examined the vessel during a redesign last year said it could safely carry.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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